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N A V A L Ships Artists Signatures HALF PRICE NAVAL ART
New Naval Packs
Battle of Trafalgar Art Prints.
Trafalgar-

Trafalgar- The Destruction of The Bucentaure by Ivan Berryman.
Trafalgar:

Trafalgar: HMS Royal Sovereign Prepares to Break the Line by Ivan Berryman.
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HMS Belfast Naval Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Randall Wilson.
HMS

HMS Belfast by Robert Taylor.
HMS

HMS Belfast During the Battle of North Cape by Randall Wilson.
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Royal Navy Submarine Prints.
Secret
Secret Operation by Robert Taylor.
The

The Malta Station by Robert Barbour.
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Pearl Harbor US Navy Prints by Robert Taylor and Randall Wilson.
The
The Calm Before the Storm by Robert Taylor.
Aloha

Aloha Hawaii by Randall Wilson.
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Swordfish Attack on the Bismarck Naval Art Prints by Stan Stokes and Ivan Berryman.
Sink

Sink the Bismarck by Stan Stokes. (B)
Bismarck

Bismarck by Ivan Berryman (B)
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Latest Naval Art Releases

 Against the darkening skies of an impending storm, HMS Victory is depicted entering Portsmouth Harbour. This iconic ship, launched in Chatham in 1765, is now preserved in Portsmouth's Historic Dockyard on public display and is still a commissioned warship in the Royal Navy. Weighing 2,162 tons, Victory was crewed by 850 men and carried 104 guns on three decks.

HMS Victory - Home Before the Squall by Ivan Berryman.
 The daylight raid on Tokyo, led by Lt Col James H. Doolittle on Sunday 18 April 1942, has rightfully entered the history books as one of the most daring and courageous operations of the Second World War. On that day, in mid ocean, Doolittle had launched his B-25 Mitchell bomber from the heaving, spray-soaked flight deck of an aircraft carrier, a deck too short to land on, and flown on to bomb Tokyo. He knew there would be no return to the USS Hornet, either for him or the 15 heavily laden B-25s behind him, for this was a feat never before attempted, and for every crew member the mission was a one-way ticket. Yet, under the leadership of Jimmy Doolittle, they all dared to survive. The mission for the 16 bombers was to bomb industrial targets in Tokyo and surrounding areas, to slow production of strategic war material, then fly on to land in the part of south-west China that was still in the hands of friendly Nationalist forces. All being well, the mission would be so unexpected it would plant the first seeds of doubt into enemy minds. It worked – the Japanese were forced to quickly divert hundreds of aircraft, men and equipment away from offensive operations to the defence of their homeland. There was, however, another reason behind the Doolittle's raid – to lift the morale of an American public devastated by the attack on Pearl Harbor four months earlier. And the success of the mission provided the boost that was needed. If any had doubted America's resolve in the face of uncertainty, the courage, determination and heroism displayed by Lt Col Doolittle and his band of aviators restored their determination. Although it might take years, and the price would be high, America and her allies understood that the fight could, and would, be won. Commissioned to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Doolittle Tokyo Raid the painting portrays the dramatic moment that Lt Col Jimmy Doolittle lifts his B-25 off the pitching deck of the USS Hornet. Having timed his launch to perfection he climbs steeply away, ready to adjust his compass bearing for a direct line to Tokyo. On the sodden deck behind him the crews of the remaining 15 aircraft, whose engines are warmed, ready and turning, will quickly follow their commanding officer into the murky sky.

Destination Tokyo by Anthony Saunders.
 Nelson's sailors and marines board the San Nicolas and during heavy hand to hand fighting capture the ship.  Nelson drives HMS Captain onto the Spanish vessel in order that she can be boarded and taken as a prize, the British marines and men scrambling up the Captain's bowsprit to use it as a bridge.  The San Nicolas then fouled the Spanish three-decker San Joseph, allowing Nelson and his men to take both ships as prizes in a single manoeuvre.

Boarding the San Nicolas by Chris Collingwood. (P)
 Few ships have been immortalised in art more than HMS Temeraire, a 98-gun veteran of the Battle of Trafalgar and iconic subject of JMW Turner's memorable painting. Although one of the finest paintings ever produced, it is known that Turner's version of this magnificent old ship's voyage to the breaker's yard is pure whimsy, composed to inspire pride and sentiment in equal parts. This painting is, perhaps, a more truthful rendering of the same scene. Here, the mighty Temeraire is reduced to a floating hulk, stripped of her masts, bowsprit and rigging, her bitumen-coated hull gutted of anything useful.  It is 7.30am on 5th September 1838. As the tide is judged to be just right, the steam tugs Sampson and Newcastle, piloted by William Scott and a crew of 25, take up the strain of the Temeraire's 2,121 tons to begin the slow journey from Sheerness to Rotherhithe, where she will be slowly taken to pieces at the yard of John Beatson. Whilst HMS Victory stands today in all her magnificence at Portsmouth, barely a trace of the ship that came to her rescue at Trafalgar exists.

The Temeraire's Last Journey by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

 Skirmishes between frigates were a common occurrence, such as here when the 32-gun HMS Amphion encountered a French opponent off Cadiz in 1806 the latter, to her great cost, straying among the British inshore squadron in the darkness of a moonless night. It is understood that the French vessel managed to escape being taken as a prize, although with much damage to her whales and rigging.

A Night Action off Cadiz by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 The hero of Trafalgar, HMS Temeraire, is depicted here at sea as she was originally constructed, with her simple scroll figurehead, and the yellow hull that was typical of the period. She has her studding sails set on the mainmast to help make all speed as she punches through the heavy swell of the English Channel. For Trafalgar, Temeraire was repainted with the 'Nelson Chequer' pattern that can be seen on HMS Victory today, this magnificent ship coming to the latter's rescue whilst fighting on with a prize lashed to each of her sides. Post Trafalgar, her crew raised enough money from their prizes to have a new figurehead carved which she carried proudly even to the scrap yard at Rotherhithe in 1838, where she was broken up.

The Good Old Temeraire by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Ships of Commodore Preble's Mediterranean Squadron are shown during the action of 3rd August 1804 when they provided support to the gunboats and mortar boats as they pounded the defensive walls and xebecs that were defending Tripoli. In the left foreground, the bomb boat Robinson rolls as she fires her mortar whilst the brig Argus takes up station behind Constitution, both of which are firing broadsides. The brig Syren is in the far distance, engaging more of the Tripolitan xebec gunboats, having cut inside of Constitution to engage the enemy more closely.

The Bombardment of Tripoli, 1804 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 The painting depicts the French ships Franklin and Peuple Souverain taking heavy fire from HMS Defence (centre) with HMS Minotaur in her wake, whilst Nelson in HMS Vanguard can be seen behind them. Other French ships, Spartiate and Conquerant can also be seen through the gap. On the far side of Franklin and Peuple Souverain, the masts and sails of the British ship Orion can be seen as she rakes the French line from the far side.

Fire in the Night - The Battle of the Nile, 1798 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

Featured Naval Signature

Lieutenant John Baber RNVR

One of the HMS Newcastle’s crew on the night of 14/15th June 1942. Posted to HMS Newcastle in January 1942, he was one of the three lookouts alongside the ship’s open Bridge, and his action station was in the cordite chamber under ‘Y’ turret. Later he was commissioned in early 1943, and served with Coastal forces, carrying out sweeps in the channel against E-boats and armed trawlers.

Click for artwork signed by this person

This Week's Half Price Naval Art Offers

HMS Ark Royal after a recent refit, rejoins the fleet in 2001.

HMS Ark Royal by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
HMS Prince of Wales is shown firing on the Bismarck and in the background a huge black cloud is all that is left of HMS Hood.

HMS Prince of Wales by Brian Wood (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
 A Fairey Swordfish launches from the Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Eagle in 1939.  HMS Eagle would later fall victim to German U-boat U-73 on 11th August 1942.

Viceless Lady by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
GIJL6310GL. A Naval Battle by Thomas Whitcombe.
A Naval Battle by Thomas Whitcombe (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

DHM1306GS.  Queen Mary at Southampton by Ivan Berryman.

Queen Mary at Southampton by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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GIFP0974GS. The Scapa Flow. A Winter Gale by William Lionel Wyllie.
The Scapa Flow. A Winter Gale by W L Wyllie. (GS)
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 Lieutenant of the Royal Navy commands marines and crew during a sea battle with the French during the battle of Cape St Vincent.

In the Thick of Battle by Chris Collingwood. (GL)
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 Showing visible signs of her tangle with British cruisers at the Battle of the River Plate, the German pocket battleship Graf Spee slips into the neutral waters of the Montevideo roadstead for light repairs.  This was to be the last haven for the Graf Spee which was later scuttled at the harbour mouth, her commander Kapitan zur See Langsdorff believing a large British fleet to be waiting for attempted escape into the South Atlantic.

Admiral Graf Spee by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00

Featured Ship


HMS Canopus



Launched : 13th October 1897
HMS Canopus. Built at Portsmouth Dockyard and laid down on the 4th January 1897, launched 21st June 1898 and completed December 1899, at a cost of 783,721. Only one of the class to serve in the Mediterranean fleet instead of the China station until returning to the Channel fleet in 1906 and in that year went into refit, to receive dire control. Further refitting was done while with the reserve at Portsmouth with reduced crew in 1908 - 09, on returning to the fleet she served as the parent ship for the 4th Division at the Nore and with the home fleet from May 1912 and again refitted at Chatham dockyard In 1913. HMS Canopus was stationed at Pembroke and at the outbreak of the great war joined the 8th battle squadron of the Channel fleet, under Admiral Stoddart on the Cape Verde Station and acted as guardship at St Vincent, and then to Abrolhos Rocks a coaling Station in the South Atlantic. Soon after she was sent to the Falkland Islands When HMS Canopus arrived at Port Stanley in bad condition and needing repairs. Admiral Cradock was concerned with the poor sailing speed of the Canopus. The Canpus was separated from the main fleet and was ordered to sail with two colliers to sail to the Island of St. Felix where they were to await the fleet. But the fleet never arrived as they were decimated by the German squadron. The Canopus returned to Porrt Stanley where she became berthed in the mud at the entrance of the port, under captain Heathcoat Grant. With the German squadron expected to attack, HMS Canopus guarded the entrance with her 12-inch guns, as well as the outer entrance was mined and also there were three batteries of twelve pounders. HMS Canopus was the only ship at Port Stanley when Von Spee's ships appeared. Canopus opened fire with the first shot in the battle of the Falkland Islands. Due to this fire and also seeing the tripod masts of the battlecruisers Invincible and Inflexible, Von Spee withdrew his ships. If he has attacked Port Stanley he certainly would have inflicted major damage. After the destruction of Von Spees squadron, HMS Canopus returned to Abrolhos Rocks. From February 1915 she was sent to the Mediterranean to support the Dardanelles expedition. While there she had a narrow escape from a torpedo from a German submarine, the same night her sister ship HMS Ocean was sunk. HMS Canopus was also damaged by Turkish gunfire on 28th April and 2nd May 1915, and was involved in grounding off Gaba Tepe. In October 1915 she transported troops to Salonika. She returned to Chatham docks on Tuesday 2nd May 1916. On returning back to Britain she became the guard ship on the East Coast until 1918 when she was sent to Devonport, where she became a accommodation ship until being sold to the breakers in 1920.

Displacement: 12,950 tons. Length: 410 ft. Beam: 74 ft. Draught: 26.5 ft. Complement: 750. Armament: four 12 ins guns, twelve 6 ins guns, ten 3 ins guns, six 3 pounder guns and two maxims with four torpedo tubes.

The crew of HMS Canapus on commissioned was Officers: Executive Officers 27, Civil Branch officers 16 and Warrant Officers 6. All Ratings (Seaman Class) 356. Signalmen 11 Engine Room Staff 142 Artisans 28 Sick Berth Staff 3 Accounting Staff 5 Naval Police, Cooks, Bandsman 41 Royal Marines Royal Marine Artillery 50 Royal marines (Royal marine Light Infantry)

Scrapped 18th February 1920.

On this day in naval history....

16 July

Found 189 matching entries.

DAY

MONTH

YEAR

SHIP

ENTRY

16thJuly1890HMS HoweArrived Spithead
16thJuly1890HMS HoweCapt. Boys in Command
16thJuly1891HMS HoweSailed Aldeburgh for exercises
16thJuly1891HMS CamperdownSailed Aldeburgh for exercises
16thJuly1891HMS ConquerorSailed Aldeburgh for exercises
16thJuly1891HMS HeroSailed Aldeburgh for exercises
16thJuly1891HMS ImmortaliteSailed Aldeburgh for exercises
16thJuly1891HMS IrisSailed Aldeburgh for exercises
16thJuly1891HMS LatonaSailed Aldeburgh for exercises
16thJuly1892HMS HeclaArrived Victoria from Unalaska
16thJuly1896HMS BenbowSailed Falmouth Roads
16thJuly1896HMS ColossusSailed Falmouth Roads
16thJuly1896HMS IphigeniaSailed Falmouth Roads
16thJuly1896HMS BrilliantSailed Falmouth Roads
16thJuly1896HMS BrilliantArrived Portland
16thJuly1896HMS CirceSailed Falmouth Roads
16thJuly1896HMS JaseurSailed Falmouth Roads
16thJuly1896HMS JaseurArrived Portland
16thJuly1896HMS JasonSailed Falmouth Roads
16thJuly1896HMS JasonArrived Portland
16thJuly1896HMS LedaSailed Falmouth Roads
16thJuly1896HMS DevastationSailed Falmouth Roads
16thJuly1896HMS DevastationArrived Portland
16thJuly1896HMS DreadnoughtSailed Falmouth Roads
16thJuly1896HMS DreadnoughtArrived Portland
16thJuly1896HMS EdinburghSailed Falmouth Roads
16thJuly1896HMS GalateaSailed Falmouth Roads
16thJuly1896HMS IrisSailed Falmouth Roads
16thJuly1896HMS IndefatigableSailed Falmouth Roads
16thJuly1896HMS IndefatigableArrived Portland
16thJuly1896HMS AlexandraSailed Falmouth Roads
16thJuly1900HMS CaesarAt Trieste
16thJuly1906HMS BulldogSold to R Gillham
16thJuly1911HMS CarnarvonArrived Plymouth
16thJuly1912HMS FoxRecommissioned at Aden
16thJuly1920HMS CommonwealthArrived Lamlash
16thJuly1920HMS CommonwealthSailed Oban
16thJuly1923HMS ColomboSailed Diego Garcia
16thJuly1925HMS EagleSailed St. Florent
16thJuly1926HMS CentaurArrived Torbay
16thJuly1926HMS ConquestArrived Torbay
16thJuly1926HMS FuriousArrived Portland
16thJuly1932HMS DelhiSailed Balboa
16thJuly1934HMS AcastaSailed Argostoli
16thJuly1934HMS DecoyArrived Argostoli
16thJuly1934HMS DecoySailed Corfu
16thJuly1934HMS, HMNZS LeanderSailed Stettin
16thJuly1934HMS EffinghamSailed Largs
16thJuly1934HMS EffinghamSailed Largs
16thJuly1934HMS FrobisherSailed Gullmar Fjord
16thJuly1934HMS FrobisherSailed Gillmar Fjord
16thJuly1934HMS HawkinsArrived Kilindini
16thJuly1935HMS HermesAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS AcheronAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS H49Attended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS GipsyAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS FoxhoundAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS EskAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS FaulknorAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS DunedinAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS CairoAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS CarlisleAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS ColomboAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS CardiffAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS CoventryAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS CuracoaAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS GloriousAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS CurlewAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS AmazonAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS AntelopeAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS CodringtonAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS EchoAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS ElectraAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS EncounterAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS EscapadeAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS EscortAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS ExpressAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS FameAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS FearlessAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS ForesightAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS ExmouthAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS GlowwormAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS GraftonAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS GreyhoundAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS GriffinAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS HerewardAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS GrenvilleAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS H32Attended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS H34Attended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS H50Attended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS L26Attended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS L27Attended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS L54Attended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS AlresfordAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS EclipseAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS BrokeAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS Iron DukeAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS EnchantressAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS HalcyonAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS HarrierAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS HoodAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS FuriousAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS GalateaAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS GalateaAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS DevonshireAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS LondonAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS FrobisherAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS BarhamAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS BasiliskAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS BlancheAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS BoadiceaAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS BoreasAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS BrazenAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS BeagleAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS BrilliantAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS BulldogAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1935HMS CourageousAttended 1935 Spithead Fleet Review
16thJuly1936HMS DauntlessSailed Malta
16thJuly1936HMS GalateaSailed Alexandria
16thJuly1937HMS FleetwoodArrived Portland
16thJuly1937HMS ImogenArrived Sheerness
16thJuly1937HMS AcheronArrived Portsmouth
16thJuly1937HMS H49Arrived Portsmouth
16thJuly1937HMS H49Arrived Portsmouth
16thJuly1937HMS EskArrived Portland
16thJuly1937HMS DragonArrived Hawkes Bay
16thJuly1937HMS DurbanArrived Falmouth
16thJuly1937HMS CairoArrived Portland
16thJuly1937HMS CuracoaArrived Portsmouth
16thJuly1937HMS GloriousArrived Malta
16thJuly1937HMS AmazonArrived Portsmouth
16thJuly1937HMS AntelopeArrived Portsmouth
16thJuly1937HMS CometArrived Malta
16thJuly1937HMS CrusaderArrived Portland
16thJuly1937HMS ElectraArrived Portland
16thJuly1937HMS EncounterArrived Portland
16thJuly1937HMS EscortArrived Portland
16thJuly1937HMS ExpressArrived Portland
16thJuly1937HMS ExmouthArrived Portland
16thJuly1937HMS GarlandArrived Almeria
16thJuly1937HMS H34Arrived Portland
16thJuly1937HMS H50Arrived Portland
16thJuly1937HMS L23Arrived Portsmouth
16thJuly1937HMS L26Arrived Portsmouth
16thJuly1937HMS L27Arrived Portland
16thJuly1937HMS L54Arrived Portsmouth
16thJuly1937HMS AlresfordSailed Looe Bay
16thJuly1937HMS AlresfordArrived and sailed Plymouth
16thJuly1937HMS LyddArrived Gibraltar
16thJuly1937HMS BridgewaterSailed Durban for Simonstown
16thJuly1937HMS EclipseArrived Portland
16thJuly1937HMS FlindersArrived Portsmouth
16thJuly1937HMS EnchantressArrived Portsmouth
16thJuly1937HMS FuriousArrived Portsmouth
16thJuly1937HMS KittiwakeArrived Portland
16thJuly1937HMS CourageousArrived Portland
16thJuly1938HMS EnterpriseArrived Malta
16thJuly1938HMS EnterpriseSailed Malta
16thJuly1939HMS BerwickSailed St. Georges
16thJuly1939HMS BerwickArrived Cornerbrook
16thJuly1940HMS ImogenInvolved in a collision
16thJuly1943HMS LapwingLaunched
16thJuly1943HMS LapwingLaunched
16thJuly1943HMS LapwingPennant U62
16thJuly1945HMS FormidableAttacked the Tokyo area
16thJuly1945HMS BarfleurAttacked the Tokyo area
16thJuly1945HMS GrenvilleAttacked the Tokyo area
16thJuly1945HMS BermudaSailed Sydney for Jervis Bay
16thJuly1945HMS Black PrinceAttacked the Tokyo area
16thJuly1951HMS ActaeonSailed Durban
16thJuly1951HMS BermudaSailed Durban
16thJuly1951HMS BermudaSailed Durban
16thJuly1958HMS GambiaArrived Mauritius. Sailed same day
16thJuly1968HMS DanaeOff Cape Wrath
16thJuly1973HMS BerwickArrived off Iceland for patrol
16thJuly2002HMS CornwallPlymouth
16thJuly2003HMS GlasgowDevonport
16thJuly2003HMS GlasgowPlymouth Sound
16thJuly2003HMS GraftonPortsmouth
16thJuly2003HMS CampbeltownDevonport
16thJuly2003HMS CampbeltownPlymouth Sound
16thJuly2004HMS InvinciblePortsmouth
16thJuly2004HMS ChathamDevonport
16thJuly2004HMS ChathamPlymouth Sound
16thJuly2007HMS BulwarkDevonport
16thJuly2007HMS ArgyllPlymouth Sound
16thJuly2008HMS ArgyllArrived Liverpool
16thJuly2008HMS CornwallPlymouth Sound
16thJuly2008HMS CampbeltownPlymouth Sound

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