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M I L I T A R Y HALF PRICE MILITARY ART
New Military Packs
Richard III and Battle of Bosworth Military Print Pack.
Battle

Battle of Bosworth by Brian Palmer.
Richard

Richard III by Chris Collingwood.
Save £175!
Duke of Wellington Military Prints.
Portrait

Portrait of Wellington by Chris Collingwood.
Wellington
Wellington at the Battle of Waterloo by Robert Hillingford.
Save £74!
Pegasus Bridge Military Print Set.
The

The Longest Day Begins - Pegasus Bridge by Geoff Lea
Storming

Storming Pegasus Bridge by David Pentland.
Save £105!
101st Airborne Division Military Art Print Pack.
Advance
Advance from Utah by Simon Smith. (AP)
Screaming

Screaming Eagles in Normandy, 7th June 1944 by David Pentland.
Save £170!
US Airborne D-Day Prints by David Pentland and Robert Taylor.
The

The Battered Band by David Pentland. (AP)
Day
Day Drop - Stick 21 by Robert Taylor. (AP)
Save £105!

Latest Military Art Releases

 The American Second Ranger Battalion under the command of Lt. Col. James E. Rudder. During the American assault of Omaha and Utah beaches on June 6, 1944, the Rangers scaled the 100-foot cliffs and seized the German artillery pieces that could have fired on the American landing troops at Omaha and Utah beaches. At a high cost of life, they successfully defended against determined German counterattacks.

Scaling the Cliffs at Pointe du Hoc by Brian Palmer. (P)
 Action at Nery, 1st September 1914.  During the fighting retreat from Mons, battery L of the Royal horse artillery bivouacked by a small town of Nery. Their temporary halt was interrupted during the early morning cavalry patrol warning of the imminent arrival of a large German force of cavalry, infantry and artillery. almost immediately German shells began bursting amongst the battery, accompanied by a rifle and machine gun fire. 3 guns were knocked out before they could be brought into action and two more were disabled soon afterwards, while the British gunners sustained heavy casualties. the remaining no. 6 gun with a scratch crew managed to maintain a steady fire for some two hours inflicting heavy casualties on the Germans until reinforcements arrived, driving off the surviving German unties. Three Victoria crosses (one posthumously) and two French medaille militaire were awarded and two NCOs were commissioned after the action.

Nery by Brian Palmer. (PC)
 After the charge up the valley and taking huge losses, The Light Brigade crashed through the Russian guns at the end of the valley. They were counter- charged by Russian cavalry. Shown here are the 11th and 8th Hussars engaging the Russian Uhlans and Dragoons. The losses to the Light Brigade were very high - 113 killed, and 134 wounded. General Pierre Bosquet after witnessing the charge remarked - It is magnificent but it is not war. The battle of Balaclava, finally ended leaving Balalcava still in British Hands.

Into the Valley of Death by Brian Palmer. (PC)
 The 87th Regiment defend the walls against the French 13th Dragoons as they charge by during the Battle of Vitoria.

87th Regiment at the Battle of Vitoria by Brian Palmer. (PC)

 After the 2nd Royal North British Dragoons had charged the French artillery, they themselves were charged by the 3rd French Chasseur Chevals and the deadly 4th Regiment of Lancers.  The scene depicted shows the French cavalry engaging the Scots Greys.

Charge of the 2nd Royal North British Dragoons (Scots Greys) at Waterloo by Brian Palmer. (PC)


Charge of the 2nd Carabiniers against the Square of the 23rd (Royal Welsh Fusiliers) at the Battle of Waterloo by Brian Palmer. (PC)
  In an attempt to expand into Europe, Ottoman Turks under the command of Grand Vizier Kara Mustafa laid siege to Vienna for two months.  A coalition of Polish, German and Austrians led by John III Sobieski, the King of Poland, arrived before Vienna to raise the siege.  Sobieski led a charge of 20,000 cavalry, including the fearsome Winged Hussars into the Ottoman camp and completely routed their army. The battle was over in three hours, the Turks fled the field leaving behind tents, weapons, battle standards and provisions.  The threat to Europe had been reversed, and this battle signaled the beginning of the end for the Ottoman Empire.

Polish Winged Lancers - Battle of Vienna, September 12th 1683 by Brian Palmer. (PC)
  In AD 9, three Roman legions - 20,000 men plus camp followers - commanded by Governor Varus crossed the Rhine into what they believed to be friendly territory on their way to putting down a local uprising. A young chieftain of the Cherusci tribe, Arminius, had guaranteed them safe passage through his lands.  However, Arminius who held a grudge against the Romans, deliberately deceived Varus and in a four-day running battle in the forest overwhelmed and slaughtered the Romans almost to a man. Varus, along with his surviving senior officers, took their own lives to avoid capture.

The Battle of Teutoburg Forest, AD 9 by Brian Palmer. (PC)

This Week's Half Price Military Art Offers

The Battle of Barnet was fought in a heavy mist, on Easter Sunday 14th April 1471. Due to a misalignment of the opposing armies, all became confusion. The centre of the battle (as depicted here) was fought at close quarters, a mass of struggling knights and men at arms with comrade fighting comrade, their vision of the battle obscured by mist. The Yorkists under the leadership of King Edward IV triumphed, leaving the Lancastrians with hopes dashed. Their champion and leader, the great Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick The King Maker lay dead, cut down while struggling to regain his charger. In the painting Edward IV charges toward the banner of Henry Holland, Duke of Exeter, while in the foreground soldiers of the Houses of York and Lancaster hack and slash at each other in terrified butchery.

Battle of Barnet by Chris Collingwood (GL)
Half Price! - £565.00
 The charge of the Scots Greys with the Gordon Highlanders holding onto the stirrups. Although this is a point of argument as to the improbability, both regiments concur that this action did happen.

Gordons and Greys to the Front by Stanley Berkeley. (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00
Confederate cavalry with the battle flag of the Confederacy gallop into battle.  The battle flag was also known as the Southern Cross.

Southern Steel by Simon Smith (P)
Half Price! - £2500.00
Robert the Bruces Scots army stand fast as the English knights attack. Robert the Bruce succeeds in defeating the English army at Stirling.  With the full might of Englands army gathered before the besieged Stirling Castle, Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory. To the west of Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots, kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God.  Patiently awaiting the coming onslaught in tightly packed schiltroms, his spearmen and archers are well prepared for battle. Unknown to the English, the open marsh of no mans land conceals hidden pits and calthrops, major obstacles for any mounted charge. Despite Cliffords and Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve Stirling the day before, years of victory have caused the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the flower of the forest (archers) to weaken the enemy formations, the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush, hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester, thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable mass of spears, hurling themselves into defeat and death. With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through but the infantry stand firm. There is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground. Casualties amongst the English nobility are horrific. Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The English recoil and are pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn where many perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of the castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland, victory is complete.

The Battle of Bannockburn by Brian Palmer (P)
Half Price! - £1700.00

 Replacements from 1st Battalion Irish Guards and Sherman tanks of the 46th Royal Tank Regiment move through the debris of Anzio town towards their jump-off positions for the Battle of Campoleone Station.

Anzio, Italy, February 1944 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
Cruiser Tanks of 1st Royal Tank Regiment at the Battle of Beda Fomm.  6th February 1941: My friend Lt Col G Vesey Holt RTR has always considered that the deeds of 1 RTR at Beda Fomm have been neglected. To put this right he commissioned me to do a painting which he then presented to his Regiment. He obtained copies of the Regiment's War Diary. I was also greatly assisted by the staff of the Tank Museum, Bovington, which has examples of these tanks on display. On 6th February 1941, a column of Italian tanks and transport vehicles was proceeding southwards along the Benghasi-Tripoli road. In the late afternoon, B squadron engaged the enemy at about 500 yards from a hull down position behind a ridge, while five or six Cruisers of A Squadron crossed the road and proceeded south amongst the Italian column, firing on the transport and guns. It was raining heavily and visibility was poor.  The scene was littered with burning wreckage of Italian M13 tank and lorries. At about 1720 hours visibility became so bad that it was almost impossible to distinguish between friend and foe, and the tanks withdrew to re-group. No British tank was destroyed, though one was left damaged.  A Squadron is indicated by the triangle on the turrets, (red for the senior regiment in the brigade). An A9 is closest, with an A10 beyond. Commanders were almost invariably visible with their hatches open. The pennants on the antenna were a recognition sign, worn at different heights which changed daily. The white circle on a red square was the sign of 7th Armoured Division. The regiment's unit code sign was a white 24 on a red square. At this period British tanks had the multi-coloured diagonally striped pattern of camouflage.  The Cruiser A9 (Mark 1) had one 2-pounder gun and one .303-in. Vickers machine-gun mounted co-axially in the main turret, and one .303-in. Vickers mg in each of the two auxiliary turrets.  The Cruiser A10 (Mark 1A) had one 2-pounder gun and two 7.92-mm Besa machine-guns.

The Battle of Beda Fomm by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Captain W Macleods Company, 1st Battalion Royal Artillery. Battle of Quebec 13th September 1759 was Wolfs final attempt to take the city. His army scaled the cliffs from Wolfes cove and fought the French army which was larger than Wolfes on the Plains of Abraham. During this battle General Wolfe was hit twice  and eventually mortally wounded when a bullet passed through his lungs. As he lay dying he heard someone shout They run - see how they run. Wolfe gave his last order to cut of the enemies retreat and his last words being Now God be praised. I will die in peace.

The Battle of Quebec, 13th September 1759 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
DHM217GS.  Ramsays Battery of Horse Artillery at the Battle of Fuentos Onoro, May 5th 1811 by Caton Woodville.
Ramsays Battery of Horse Artillery at the Battle of Fuentos Onoro, May 5th 1811 by Richard Caton Woodville (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00

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