Order Enquiries (UK) : 01436 820269

You currently have no items in your basket


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

H O M E M I L I T A R Y A V I A T I O N N A V A L S P O R T
Don't Miss Any Special Deals - Sign Up To Our Newsletter!
Product Search         
Voyage into Destiny by Robert Taylor. (B) - CranstonFineArts .com

Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints and many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS!
Many of our offers end in 19 hours, 51 minutes!
View our Special Offers

Voyage into Destiny by Robert Taylor. (B)


Voyage into Destiny by Robert Taylor. (B)

Leaving the port of Gdynia on May 18th 1941, two large German warships stealthily zig-zagged their way up the coast of Norway at the outset of what was to become one pf the shortest, most fiercely fought naval contests of the Second World War. Operation Rheinubung was under way. With Fleet Commander Admiral Lutjens on the bridge, the brand new battleship Bismarck would leave the relative safety of the Norwegian fjords, destined for the busy shipping lanes in the Atlantic. After refuelling, and in company with the battlecruiser Prinz Eugen, on May 21st the two heavily armed warships headed for the Denmark Strait and out into the wide expanse of the Atlantic. Bound for active convoy routes, Bismarck would play havoc with vital Allied merchant shipping. Faster than almost any warship afloat, the magnificent new 42,000 ton monsters awesome firepower would prove no match for the lightly protected merchantmen or their escorts, as they laboriously plied their desperately needed cargo across the ocean towards Europe. It seemed she was invincible. Within three days of sailing, Bismarcks first encounter was a triumph! Intercepted south west of Iceland by the British Home Fleet, the German battleships gunners went into action for the first time, their second and third salvos striking the battlecruiser Hood. She exploded and sank within three minutes. But Bismarcks success brought the wrath of the Royal Navy upon her and, just three days later, on the morning of May 27th, with her rudder damaged by a torpedo, the pride of the German navy fell to the guns of the British Home Fleet. Outnumbered, she fought bravely, but succumbed, the magnificent new battleships active war lasting less than a week. The battleship Bismarck off the coast of Norway at the start of Operation Rheinubung. Under the watchful eye of Jagdeschwader 77s Me 109 fighters, in company with the battlecruiser Prinz Eugen, and destroyers Hans Lody and Z23, Germanys magnificent new battleship Bismarck is seen manoeuvring near Korsfjord Bergen on May 21, 1941. That evening, with Prinz Eugen, she will leave for Arctic waters, the Denmark Strait, the Atlantic, and destiny. Within days the pride of the German Kriegsmarine will have passed into history.
Item Code : DHM1642BVoyage into Destiny by Robert Taylor. (B) - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTStudio Presentation Proof.

SOLD OUT
Paper size 34 inches x 24 inches (87cm x 61cm) Scheufele, Ernst
Dahmer, Hugo
Peters, Otto
Hellwig, Hans
Steeg, Heinz
Kuhn, Karl
Weintz, Walter
Schuck, Walter
+ Artist : Robert Taylor
SOLD
OUT
NOT
AVAILABLE
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

Other editions of this item : Voyage into Destiny by Robert Taylor.DHM1642
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Veterans edition of 500 prints.

SOLD OUT.
Paper size 34 inches x 24 inches (87cm x 61cm) Scheufele, Ernst
Dahmer, Hugo
Peters, Otto
+ Artist : Robert Taylor
SOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Veterans edition of 10 artist proofs.

SOLD OUT.
Paper size 34 inches x 24 inches (87cm x 61cm) Scheufele, Ernst
Dahmer, Hugo
Peters, Otto
+ Artist : Robert Taylor
SOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
FLYER Robert Taylor Promotional Flyer. A4 Size Double Sheet 11.5 inches x 8 inches (30m x 21cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£2.00VIEW EDITION...

Signatures on this item
NameInfo


Hauptmann Hugo Dahmer (deceased)
Hugo Dahmer . Flying with Adolf Galland's 6./JG26, Hugo Dahmer was one of II Gruppe's most successful pilots. By Feb 1941 Hugo Dahmer had in total 12 victories, built up during the Battles in France and Britain. He then served in Norway with 1./JG77 Dahmer was awarded the Knight's Cross during the invasion of Russia. For a short while back with JG26, then III./JG2. He scored 57 victories, flying a total of 309 missions. Hugo Dahmer passed away on 1st August 2008.
Maschinemaat Heinz Steeg (deceased)Bismarck survivor. Passed away 25th November 2004.


The signature of Maschinenobergefreiter Otto Peters (deceased)

Maschinenobergefreiter Otto Peters (deceased)
Born 8th May 1919, Otto Peters joined the Kriegsmarine in April 1939. Posted to Bismarck, he was one of the first to join the crew at the Blohm and Voss shipyard in his hometown of Hamburg. As a leading stoker, Otto was on fire-watch when he heard over the tannoy that the Royal Navy had undertaken all necessary efforts to sink the Bismarck, and recalls that he knew at once their days were numbered. Otto was picked up after the sinking by the Cruiser HMS Dorsetshire, there were just 115 survivors from the crew of over 2000. Otto Peters died in December 2013.
Matrosenbergefreiter Karl Kuhn (deceased)Bismarck survivor. Passed away 17th May 2004.
Obergefreiter Hans Hellwig (deceased)Hans Hellwig joined the Kriegsmarine at the age of eighteen in January 1940, and served on the Bismarck from May of that year, through to 27 May, 1941. He was part of the gun-crew in one of Bismarcks main 15-inch turrets. In the final deadly duel with the Royal Navy his gun was eventually destroyed but he continued in action serving one of the starboard 6-inch guns until the end. Hans Hellwig passed away on 4th May 2005.


The signature of Oberleutnant Ernst Scheufele (deceased)

Oberleutnant Ernst Scheufele (deceased)
Joining the Luftwaffe in October 1940, Ernst Scheufele was posted to Norway in June 1942, to join 4./JG5. There, flying Me109s he carried out a total of 67 escort missions for the German battleships Bismarck and Tirpitz. In October 1943 he joined II./JG5 flying over Arctic waters, in Finland, and on the Russian Front, before transferring to the defence of the Reich in June 1944. On 3 December 1944 he was shot down by an American flak battery near Saxony, wounded and taken prisoner. He had a total of 18 victories. Sadly, Ernst Scheufele died on 18th February 2010.


The signature of Oberleutnant Walter Schuck (deceased)

Oberleutnant Walter Schuck (deceased)
Initially with JG3, Walter Schuck was posted north to 7./JG5 in April 1942. On 15 June 1944 he chalked up his 100th victory during a day when he shot down 6 aircraft. Two days later he had his most successful day, achieving 12 victories in twenty-four hours, a feat never surpassed in JG5. On 1 August, he assumed command of 10./JG5. Walter Schuck transferred to fly the Me262 as Staffelkapitan of 3./JG7, and achieved 8 further victories flying the new jet. His final tally was 206 air victories. He was awarded the Knights Cross with Oak Leaves. Walter Schuck died on 27th March 2015.
The signature of Walter Weintz (deceased)

Walter Weintz (deceased)
A signature rarely found on art prints, Walter Weintz is a survivor of the sinking of German battleship Bismarck. Walter Weintz was born on the 21st of February1922. Walter Weintz joined the Kriegsmarine in 1940, after his basic naval training he did staff duty in Warnemnde and Copenhagen, Denmark, transferring to the Bismarck in April 1941 in Gotenhafen as a radio operator and encoder / decoder and was given the action station in radio room A. Walter was at his battle station during the final engagement on the 27th May 1941. He survived the sinking of the Bismarck and was one of the 85 survivors to be picked up by the British cruiser HMS Dorsetshire. Walter Weintz became a POW and stayed in England for 6 months before being transported to Canada. After the war Walter returned to Germany on the 13th of March 1947, and went to work at his fathers company in Hassloch before taking employment with BASF chemical company in Ludwigsburg until he retired. In May 2002, Walter along with another Bismarck survivor Karl Kuhn went with James Cameron's filming team on the filming expidition to the wreck of the Bismarck. Sadly, Walter Weintz died on 8th January 2009 in Hassloch near Mannheim at the age of 86.
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Me109Willy Messerschmitt designed the BF109 during the early 1930s. The Bf109 was one of the first all metal monocoque construction fighters with a closed canopy and retractable undercarriage. The engine of the Me109 was a V12 aero engine which was liquid-cooled. The Bf109 first saw operational service during the Spanish Civil War and flew to the end of World War II, during which time it was the backbone of the Luftwaffe fighter squadrons. During the Battle of Britian the Bf109 was used in the role of an escort fighter, a role for which it was not designed for, and it was also used as a fighter bomber. During the last days of May 1940 Robert Stanford-Tuck, the RAF ace, got the chance to fly an Me109 which they had rebuilt after it had crash landed. Stanford-Tuck found out that the Me109 was a wonderful little plane, it was slightly faster than the Spitfire, but lacked the Spitfire manoeuvrability. By testing the Me109, Tuck could put himself inside the Me109 when fighting them, knowing its weak and strong points. With the introduction of the improved Bf109F in the spring of 1941, the type again proved to be an effective fighter during the invasion of Yugoslavia and during the Battle of Crete and the invasion of Russia and it was used during the Siege of the Mediteranean island of Malta. The Bf109 was the main fighter for the Luftwaffe until 1942 when the Fw190 entered service and shared this position, and was partially replaced in Western Europe, but the Me109 continued to serve on the Eastern Front and during the defence of the Reich against the allied bombers. It was also used to good effect in the Mediterranean and North Africa in support of The Africa Korps. The Me109 was also supplied to several German allies, including Finland, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Croatia, and Slovakia. The Bf109 scored more kills than any other fighter of any country during the war and was built in greater numbers with a total of over 31,000 aircraft being built. The Bf109 was flown by the three top German aces of the war war. Erich Hartmann with 352 victories, Gerhard Barkhorn with 301 victories and Gunther Rall with 275 kills. Bf109 pilots were credited with the destruction of 100 or more enemy aircraft. Thirteen Luftwaffe Aces scored more than 200 kills. Altogether this group of pilots were credited with a total of nearly 15,000 kills, of which the Messerschmitt Bf109 was credited with over 10,000 of these victories. The Bf109 was the most produced warplane during World War II, with 30,573 examples built during the war, and the most produced fighter aircraft in history, with a total of 33,984 units produced up to April 1945. Bf109s remained in foreign service for many years after World War II. The Swiss used their Bf109Gs well into the 1950s. The Finnish Air Force did not retire their Bf109Gs until March 1954. Romania used its Bf109s until 1955. The Spanish Hispanos flew even longer. Some were still in service in the late 1960s.
Ship Details
Bismarck

Bismarck

Sunk 27th May 1941

Built by Blohm und Voss of Hamburg and launched on the 14th February 1939, the Bismarck spent the following 18 months fitting out. On the 24th of August 1940 the Bismarck was handed over to the German Navy. During the battle of the Denmark Strait, her main adversary, HMS Hood blew up after receiving hits to the magazine. In response to this, the Royal Navy vowed to sink the Bismarck, and on 27th May 1941, just days after the battle with HMS Hood, Bismarck lay on the sea floor. With her rudder jammed by a torpedo hit from a Swordfish aircraft, she was a sitting duck for the combined firepower of HMS Rodney and HMS King George V, who ruthlessly pounded the German battleship before she was finished off by torpedoes from British cruisers.

Specifications of the the battleship Bismarck :
Armament: eight 15-inch Guns and 12 6-inch Guns, with a secondary armament of 16 40-inch guns and 16 1.5inch AA Guns.
Speed : 30 Knots
Compliment of 2,400
Dimensions
Length. 823.5 feet.
Width 118 feet
Height 29.5 feet
Displacement 41,700 tonnes.

Prinz Eugen

Prinz Eugen

Surrendered to Allied forces, 8th May 1945. To United States (USS Prinz Eugen) 5th January 1946.

Contact Details
Shipping Info
Terms and Conditions
Classified Ads
Valuations

Join us on Facebook!

Sign Up To Our Newsletter!

Stay up to date with all our latest offers, deals and events as well as new releases and exclusive subscriber content!

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Follow us on Twitter!

Return to Home Page