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Latest Aviation Art Releases

 The engineers at Rolls-Royce had worked their magic.  They had somehow managed to squeeze every available ounce of power out of the current Merlin engine and by D-Day on 6 June 1944 the sleek Mk.IX Spitfires of Fighter Command reigned supreme in the skies over Normandy.  The magnificent Mk.IXs were, by far, the most numerous variant of Spitfires that fought from D-Day to the threshold of the Reich.  In the great drive from Normandy across northern France, Belgium and into Holland the Spitfire pilots of Fighter Command threw down the gauntlet to any Luftwaffe pilots brave enough, or foolhardy enough, to tangle with them.  Perhaps the greatest pilot to ever fly the Spitfire was the RAF&39;s top fighter Ace Johnnie Johnson.  His resolute determination and steadfast leadership came into its own during D-Day and the subsequent advance through Normandy, and he would finish the war as the highest scoring Allied Ace in Europe.  The scene captures the moment when, as Wing Leader of 127 Canadian Wing, Johnnie is seen leading Mk.IX Spitfires from 421 <i>Red Indian</i> Squadron RCAF out on patrol from their airfield at Evère near Brussels on a cold December morning in 1944.  It is close to the fighting and the German front line so, as the Canadians climb steadily out over the snow clad landscape in the golden light of dawn, they are already alert and on the lookout for the first signs of trouble.

Midwinter Dawn by Robert Taylor.
 The swaggering figure of the Reichsmarshal swept imperiously into the Air Ministry on Berlin's Wilhemstrasse, his jewel-encrusted baton and extravagant uniform as flamboyant as ever. This was Saturday, 30th January 1943, the tenth Anniversary of the Nazi Party coming to power, and Goering was about to deliver the main speech in tribute to the Party and its leader, the Fuhrer - Adolf Hitler.  The Royal Air Force had other plans for the anniversary.  In stark defiance of the imagined air security safeguarding Berlin, brave pilots of 105 and 139 Sqn's took to the air in de Havilland Mosquitoes, on course for Germany.  Their mission: RAF Bomber Command's first daylight raid on Berlin!  The raid was timed to perfection and three Mosquitoes of 105 Sqn raced headlong, low level towards their target - the Haus des Rundfunks, headquarters of the German State broadcasting company.  It was an hour before Goering could finally be broadcast.  He was boiling with rage and humiliation.  A few hours later, adding further insult, Mosquitoes from 139 Sqn swept over the city in a second attack moments before Goebbels addressed a Nazi mass rally in the Sportpalast.  Goering's promise that enemy aircraft would never fly over the Reich was broken, the echo of that shame would haunt him for the rest of the war.  This  dramatic painting pays tribute to this pivotal moment in the war, capturing the Mosquito B.Mk.IVs of 105 Sqn departing the target area, following their successful strike on the Haus des Rundfunk.

Strike on Berlin by Anthony Saunders.
 Without air supremacy D-Day and the invasion of north-west Europe would never have happened, and the tactical Ninth Air Force played a huge part in securing that position.  The Ninth had fought with distinction from the deserts of North Africa to the invasion of Sicily and the fighting in Italy.  They had spearheaded the assault on Ploesti and, from humble beginnings, had grown into one of the finest and most formidable Air Forces in the USAAF.  Then, in October 1943, the Ninth were sent to England for their greatest challenge so far - providing air support for the US First Army during the forthcoming invasion of Normandy.  By the morning of 6th June 1944 the Ninth was the largest and most effective tactical air force in the world, with over a quarter of a million personnel and more than 3,500 fighters, bombers and troop-carriers under its command.  Amongst them were the P-47s of the 365th Fighter Group - the fearsome <i>Hell Hawks</i> - a unit that by the end of World War Two would become legendary.  Amongst the first to use P-47s as fighter-bombers, the <i>Hell Hawks</i> were hard at work softening up the enemy in the build up to D-Day, dive-bombing bridges, rail lines, gun positions and airfields.  With two 1,000-pound bombs below their wings along with ten 5-in rockets and eight .50 calibre machine guns, their enormous firepower devastated the German defenses on D-Day.  The <i>Hell Hawks</i> supported the army throughout the Normandy campaign, all the way across northern France to the Battle of the Bulge in December 1944, and beyond.  It was a harsh nomadic life, eating and sleeping in tents and moving from one temporary strip to the next.  By the end of hostilities in May 1945 the <i>Hell Hawks</i> had moved through 11 different airfields, more than any other fighter-bomber group in the Ninth Air Force.
Hell Hawks Over Utah by Robert Taylor.
 B-17G 2107027 is depicted limping home to Bassingbourn with the starboard outer propeller feathered following a raid during the Summer of 1944.  'Hikin' for Home' served with the 322nd Bomb Sqn, 91st Bomb Group as part of the 8th Air Force.  Escorting her home is Major George Preddy, the highest scoring P-51 pilot and sixth in the list of all-time top American Aces, seen here flying 413321 'Cripes a Mighty 3rd'.

Hikin' for Home by Ivan Berryman.

Latest Naval Art Releases

 Often described as the most beautiful of all the clippers, the Aberdeen White Star Line's Thermopylae was Cutty Sark's only true rival, the pair often racing each other home to Great Britain from the Far East.  She was unusual in that her design opted for slightly shorter masts, while the span of her yards was increased to compensate, her vast mainsail having a drop of 40ft, carried on a yard that was 80ft wide.  Launched in 1868 at Aberdeen, her fate was a scandal, this wonderful ship being sold to the Portuguese government who employed her briefly as a training ship before she was callously torpedoed and sunk for target practice by the Portuguese navy in December 1907.

Thermopylae by Ivan Berryman.
 Launched on 21st March 2003 as the new flagship of the Cunard fleet, the Queen Mary 2 represents the very pinnacle of ocean liner design, not just in her incredible size and speed, but in the quality of her build and the sumptuousness of her interior.  At 345m long, she is the largest liner ever built and, since her inaugural cruise in January 2004, she has covered over 1.5 million nautical miles and carried 1.3 million passengers.

Queen Mary 2 - Queen of Them All by Ivan Berryman.
 Typical of the many hundreds of craft that took part in the 6th June 1944 landings at Normandy at the opening of Operation Overlord, these unarmed Royal Navy Landing Craft (LCAs) bravely transported many thousands of British and Canadian infantry to the beaches under the most intense fire.

Into the Storm by Ivan Berryman.
 Launched at Bucklers Hard in Hampshire in 1803, the frigate HMS Euryalus is probably best known for the small part she played at Trafalgar.  She was one of four British frigates sent to observe the combined French and Spanish fleets as they left Cadiz for what would become the Battle of Trafalgar.  Having shadowed the enemy through the night, Euryalus sped ahead to warn the British fleet, commanded by Admiral Lord Nelson.  Too small to play a significant part in the battle itself, Euryalus stood off until the afternoon when she took the badly damaged Royal Sovereign in tow, Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood transferring his flag to the little frigate following the death of Nelson.  By 1825, her career as a fighting ship was over and she was decommissioned to become a prison ship until the mid 1840s when she became a coal hulk.  She soldiered on in number of other menial roles until 1860 when she was finally broken up.

HMS Euryalus - Shadowing the Fleet by Ivan Berryman.

Latest Military Art Releases

 Normandy, France, 1944. Lloyd carriers and 6 pounder anti-tank guns of the British 43rd (Wessex) Division prepare to deploy in a French field against possible German counter attacks.

A Suitable Site by David Pentland.
 Normandy, France, 1944. British Churchill Mk VII tanks of 147 Regiment, 34th Tank Brigade, Royal Armoured Corps, move through a deserted Normandy farmyard in the dense Normandy Bocage.

Mr Churchill's Tank by David Pentland.
 Normandy, France, 1944. US M5 Stuart 'Fish n Chips' of 113th Cavalry Regiment, 83rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Armoured Division engage targets from a Normandy field.

Fish n Chips by David Pentland.
 Normandy, France, June 1944. M4 Sherman III and Firefly Vc's of the 13/18th Hussars, 27th Armoured Brigade, link up with British paratoops at Breville.

Hussars to the Rescue by David Pentland.

Latest Sport Art Releases



The Last Three by Alwyn Crawshaw.
 Italian born Simoncelli was a highly promising rider who tragically lost his life at the 2011 Malaysian Grand Prix.  This image is Ray's tribute to this hugely talented young rider.  It depicts Marco Simoncelli racing for the Metis Gilera team in the 2008 250cc World Championship.  The 2008 season saw Simoncelli secure what was to be his only World Championship where a total of 6 race wins and 12 podium finishes saw him finish 37 points ahead of his nearest rival in the Championship standings.

Marco Simoncelli by Ray Goldsbrough.
 David Jefferies, 1000 TAS Suzuki, powers out of Waterworks on his way to a new outright TT lap record - lap 2 Senior TT 2002.

Rhapsody in Blue by Rod Organ.
 Valentino Rossi leads team mate Colin Edwards on the 50th Anniversary Yamahas at the US Moto GP at Laguna Seca, California in 2006.

Yellow Fever by Rod Organ.

This Week's Half Price Art Offers

 Maurice <i>Peter</i> Brown damages a Dornier Do.17 in his 41 Squadron Spitfire on 30th September 1940.

Dorniers Demise by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £260.00
DHM206. Napoleon by Ernest Crofts.

Napoleon by Ernest Crofts.
Half Price! - £25.00
FAR635. Muirfield - 13th Hole by Mark Chadwick

Muirfield - 13th Hole by Mark Chadwick
Half Price! - £20.00
DHM594P.  17th Light Dragoons, 1780 by Jim Lancia.
17th Light Dragoons, 1780 by Jim Lancia. (P)
Half Price! - £1000.00

On the 6th November 1792 Dumouriez defeated the Austrians under the Duke of Saxe Teshen and Clerfayt at Jemappes, near Mons. This led to the French Occupation of Belgium.
The Battle of Jemappes by Horace Vernet (B)
Half Price! - £25.00
Saturday, 1 September, 2001.  Germany had only ever lost one World Cup qualifier at home in their history - but suddenly they were torn apart by an England team playing great attacking football  in Munich.  Coming from behind, Michael Owen blasted a stunning hat-trick, with Steven Gerrard  scoring England's 2nd and Heskey scoring the 5th goal, making the final score 5 - 1 to England.  This superb painting by Darren Baker shows Heskey celebrating his goal with a jubilant Owen and Beckham also celebrating.  <br><br>Germany: Kahn, Worns, Linke, Nowotny, Boehme, Hamann, Rehmer, Ballack, Deisler, Jancker, Neuville. <br><br>England: Seaman, G Neville, Ferdinand, Campbell, A Cole, Barmby, Scholes, Gerrard, Beckham, Heskey, Owen.
England v Germany 5 - 1 by Darren Baker
Half Price! - £75.00
 Boeing Chinook of No.7 Squadron (detachment) from RAF Aldergrove, flying on supply duty in the west of the province.

Chinook over the Sperrins by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00
<b>Ex display prints in near perfect condition. </b>

The Passage of the Bidassoa by Wellingtons Army, 7th October 1813 by J P Beadle. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00

DHM825GL. Centurian by Chris Collingwood.

Centurian by Chris Collingwood (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00
Leading 30th Corps assault across the Seine at Vernon, 43rd Wessex Division gained an initial foothold on the east bank.  Heroic efforts however by the Royal Engineers of 71st, 72nd and 73rd Field Companies, succeeded in constructing a Class 9 Bailey bridge (David, shown left) and a Second Class 40 bridge (Goliath, shown right)  Despite constant enemy fire this amazing feat was achieved in only 2 days, and allowed 15/19th Hussars Cromwells and 4.7th Dragoons Guards Shermans to cross just in time to repulse a serious German counter attack by Tiger IIs of SS Panzer Abteilung 101.

David and Goliath, Vernon, France, 27th August 1944 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00


Heroes of Goodison Park by Doug Harker. (Y)
Half Price! - £165.00
This picture depicts the closing moments of the life of Socrates.  Condemned to death or exile by the Athenian government for his teaching methods which aroused scepticism and impiety in his students, Socrates heroicly rejected exile and accepted death from hemlock.  Here the philosopher continues to speak even while reaching for the cup, demonstrating his indifference to death and his unyielding commitment to his ideals.  Jacques Louis David  painted this historical picture in 1787.  Commissioned by the Trudaine de Montigny brothers, leaders in the call for a free market system and more public discussion.

Death of Socrates by Jacques Louis David. (Y)
Half Price! - £300.00

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New Print Packs
Balaclava Military Art Print Pack.
Officer

Officer 17th Lancers, Balaclava 1854 by Mark Churms.
Charge

Charge of the 17th Lancers at the Battle of the Balaclava by Brian Palmer.
Save £80!
Pegasus Bridge Military Art Print Pack.
Piper

Piper Bill, Pegasus Bridge, Normandy, 13.00hrs, 6th June 1944 by David Pentland.
Storming

Storming Pegasus Bridge by David Pentland.
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Royal Navy Cruisers Naval Prints.
HMS

HMS Belfast by Robert Taylor.
HMS

HMS Belfast During the Battle of North Cape by Randall Wilson.
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Dambusters 70th Anniversary Double Remarques by Anthony Saunders.
Final

Final Briefing by Anthony Saunders. (RMB)
The

The Breach by Anthony Saunders. (RMB)
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Battle of Trafalgar Maritime Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.
The
The Battle of Trafalgar by Robert Taylor.
The

The Battle of Trafalgar - The First Engagement by Ivan Berryman.
Save £130!