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Latest Aviation Art Releases

 Continuing his popular series of Giclée Studio Proofs on canvas, Robert Taylor portrays Squadron Leader 'Sailor' Malan DFC, Commanding Officer of 74 Squadron and one of the great Battle of Britain Aces, in his famous painting Height of the Battle.  Having already made one diving attack into the force of Luftwaffe He111 bombers approaching London with their fighter escort, 'Sailor' peels his Spitfire over for a second attack. Another top Ace, Pilot Officer Harbourne Stephen DFC, is hard on his heels. Below them, typifying the scene as it was on the afternoon of Wednesday 11 September 1940, Mk.I Hurricanes from 17 and 56 Squadrons have already joined the fray.
Height of the Battle by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 The latest Giclée technology has once again brought Robert Taylor's sophisticated artistry to life to faithfully replicate his classic painting of the Hurricanes of 1 Squadron (RCAF).  Becoming operational at Northolt in August 1940 they served with great distinction throughout the Battle of Britain.
Maple Leaf Scramble by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 Few flew the Hurricane better in combat than Squadron Leader John Grandy, Commanding Officer of 249 Squadron. Robert Taylor's iconic painting Hurricane Attack portrays him about to pounce on a Bf110 over the Isle of Wight in August 1940.
Hurricane Attack by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 By any military standards, it is difficult to imagine the Supreme Commander of the largest air force of the day, piloting himself over the battlefront during the early moments of one of historys greatest military operations. But General Jimmy Doollittle was no ordinary commander. Already awarded Americas highest decoration for valour, General Doolittle was, by the summer of 1944, in command of the American 8th Air Force. On the morning of 6 June, D-Day, he dispatched 1350 bombers together with his entire fighter force to attack enemy ground installations near the beachheads. Sitting around waiting for intelligence reports was not Jimmy Doolittles style. He was going to see for himself what was happening! With Pat Partridge as wingman, they took off flying P-38 Lightnings - chosen for their distinctive profile in the hopes they would deter friendly fire - and climbed above the overcast. Having observed the 8th Air Forces operations at first hand, as they turned for home, Doolittle spotted a hole in the clouds, flick-rolled through it and disappeared beneath the cloud layer. Pat Partridge had his head in the cockpit, probably changing his gas tanks, and when he looked up there was no sign of his Supreme Commander, he circled around for a while, then headed for home. Beneath the clouds Doolittle saw - the most impressive and unforgettable sight I could have possibly imagined - . As some 5000 ships of all shapes and sizes landed 176,000 troops on the enemy held beaches of Northern France, Doolittle flew up and down the battlefront assessing how the invasion was progressing, and after a two and a half hour sortie, headed back to base. After landing, Doolittle hurried over to General Eisenhowers headquarters to provide the first report Eisenhower received, beating his own intelligence information by several hours.
Doolittles D-Day, 6th June 1944 by Robert Taylor. (GS)

Latest Naval Art Releases

 Arguably the best known warship in the world, and one of only a few survivors of her era, HMS Victory was the flagship of Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson at Trafalgar in 1805, leading the victorious British fleet into battle against the combined French and Spanish navies.  Severely damaged during the battle, she remained afloat at Portsmouth into the 20th century and is now preserved there in dry dock for future generations to visit.  Extraordinarily, HMS Victory is still a commissioned ship in the Royal Navy and is frequently used for ceremonial duties.

HMS Victory by Ivan Berryman.
 Often described as the most beautiful of all the clippers, the Aberdeen White Star Line's Thermopylae was Cutty Sark's only true rival, the pair often racing each other home to Great Britain from the Far East.  She was unusual in that her design opted for slightly shorter masts, while the span of her yards was increased to compensate, her vast mainsail having a drop of 40ft, carried on a yard that was 80ft wide.  Launched in 1868 at Aberdeen, her fate was a scandal, this wonderful ship being sold to the Portuguese government who employed her briefly as a training ship before she was callously torpedoed and sunk for target practice by the Portuguese navy in December 1907.

Thermopylae by Ivan Berryman.
 Launched on 21st March 2003 as the new flagship of the Cunard fleet, the Queen Mary 2 represents the very pinnacle of ocean liner design, not just in her incredible size and speed, but in the quality of her build and the sumptuousness of her interior.  At 345m long, she is the largest liner ever built and, since her inaugural cruise in January 2004, she has covered over 1.5 million nautical miles and carried 1.3 million passengers.

Queen Mary 2 - Queen of Them All by Ivan Berryman.
 Typical of the many hundreds of craft that took part in the 6th June 1944 landings at Normandy at the opening of Operation Overlord, these unarmed Royal Navy Landing Craft (LCAs) bravely transported many thousands of British and Canadian infantry to the beaches under the most intense fire.

Into the Storm by Ivan Berryman.

Latest Military Art Releases

 Private and Officer - Royal Army Medical Corps, Surgeon-General - Army Medical Staff, Sergeant-Major - Royal Army Medical Corps.

Army Medical Corps by Richard Simkin
 Bridging, Review and Marching Order - Officers, Review Order - Field-Officer and Sapper, Constructing Shelter Trench.

Volunteer Royal Engineers by Richard Simkin
 Undress - Officer, Review Order - Field Officer and Officer, Review Order - 16 Pounder Rifled Muzzle-Loading Field Gun and Detachment.

Volunteer Royal Artillery by Richard Simkin
 Lieutenant - Royal Field Artillery, Captain - Royal Engineers, Lieutenant and Captain (Field Service Hat) - Infantry of the Line, Major (Foreign Service Hat) - Cavalry, Captain - Army Service Corps, Staff.

The New Service Dress for British Officers by Richard Simkin

Latest Sport Art Releases



The Last Three by Alwyn Crawshaw.
 Italian born Simoncelli was a highly promising rider who tragically lost his life at the 2011 Malaysian Grand Prix.  This image is Ray's tribute to this hugely talented young rider.  It depicts Marco Simoncelli racing for the Metis Gilera team in the 2008 250cc World Championship.  The 2008 season saw Simoncelli secure what was to be his only World Championship where a total of 6 race wins and 12 podium finishes saw him finish 37 points ahead of his nearest rival in the Championship standings.

Marco Simoncelli by Ray Goldsbrough.
 David Jefferies, 1000 TAS Suzuki, powers out of Waterworks on his way to a new outright TT lap record - lap 2 Senior TT 2002.

Rhapsody in Blue by Rod Organ.
 Valentino Rossi leads team mate Colin Edwards on the 50th Anniversary Yamahas at the US Moto GP at Laguna Seca, California in 2006.

Yellow Fever by Rod Organ.

This Week's Half Price Art Offers

 Aircraft number 2247, flown by Lt McElroy, attacks the Yokosuka Yard near Tokyo. He was one of the 18 B25 Mitchell bombers which took part in the famous retaliatory raid on Japan.

Doolittle Raider, Tokyo, April 18th 1942 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £50.00
 Undoubtedly one of the truly great Aces of the First World War, William Billy Bishop became celebrated for his technique of actively seeking out the enemy and bringing the fight to him, rather than the more usual practice of patrolling in search of enemy activity. An example of this was his single-handed attack on a German airfield in June 1917 when he destroyed not only a number of aircraft on the ground, but then successfully despatched another seven Albatross scouts that took off to engage him. For this action, he was awarded the Victoria Cross in August 1917 and his final tally when the war ended was 72 confirmed victories. He is depicted here in his Nieuport Scout B1566 in combat with a Pfalz D.III.

Captain William Billy Bishop by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00
B41. Nigel Mansell, McLaren MP4/10/B by Ivan Berryman.

Nigel Mansell, McLaren MP4/10/B by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00
B50. Jean Alesi/ Ferrari 412 by Ivan Berryman.

Jean Alesi/ Ferrari 412 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00

 A pair of Fw190F fighters during the winter of 1943. The Fw190F and G had become the Luftwaffes standard fighter-bomber for ground attack.  The Fw190F was very effective in this role. Additional armour protection was given to ground-attack variants and the G version also could carry a single 4,000-pound (1,800-kg) bomb or numbers of smaller bombs. The Fw190 was also used as a successful night fighter during the autumn and early winter of 1943–44, using conventional daylight methods to attack RAF bombers after searchlights had illuminated them.

Fw190F Fighters - Winter 1943 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £70.00
 On the night of 6th April 1812 Wellingtons Army, surrounding the walled Spanish town of Badajoz (garrisoned by Napoleons soldiers under general Baron Philippon) is ready to attack! The men of the 45th regiment from Pictons 3rd Division launch themselves in a desperate and bloody assault against the north castle wall. Carrying improvised ladders, the men have their top buttons undone, overalls rolled up and are stripped for action. The castles defenders (Germans, allied to Napoleon of the Graf und Erbprinz Regiment from Hesse-Darmstadt) partroling the walls in their greatcoats are intially surprised by the bold assault from this sector but they have been preparing the strong defenses for some time. Soon the night air is full of musketry, falling masonry, burning bundles of ropes and exploding grenades or mines. Despite the horrific casualties suffered the attackers press home. As the first scaling ladders are raised near a small bell tower the young Lt. James Macpherson reaches for the top of the wall. The ladders are too short! Undaunted he cries to his men below to lift the base of the ladder closer to the wall. This rapid, vertical movement suddenly propels him to a height several feet above the Germans heads. A shot rings out as one of the defenders fires point blank into the young mans chest. Fortunately the lead ball only strikes a glancing blow, cleaving in two a button of the officers waist coat and dislocating one of his ribs. Despite his fortunate escape, the force of the impact nearly sends him tumbling from the ladder. Somehow he maintains his grasp but the ladder itself gives way under the weight of the men following. Some unfortunates are impaled on the bayonets of their comrades below. Leaping from the rungs of another ladder, Corporal Kelly is the first man over the top and gradually the 45th gain a foothold on the ramparts. The rest of the regiment is ordered to unfix bayonets. Using the few remaining ladders, others also manage to scale the walls. Through the carnage they climb, club and shoot their way into the castle itself! Maepherson now regains consciousness at the foot of the wall and revived with a cup of coco from his friend A.A. General Hercules Packenham, who was directly behind him on the ladder when it broke. Though winded by the shot he rises to his feet. This sudden movement relocates his rib and he is able to climb the ladders once more. Once over the defense he sees the old towers of Apendez and Albar-rana to his left and the cathedral illuminated by gun fire in the distance. However his objective is directly ahead. Atop the abandoned tower of Santa Maria before him still flies the French tricolour. Macplierson seizes the opportunity, mounts the spiral stairway to the top turret and pulls down the enemy flag. For want of a substitute he flies his own red jacket from the pole, signifying that the castle has fallen. In the rest of the town the fighting continues and turns into a blood lust. Badajoz is one of the bloodiest and violent sieges of the Peninsula War. On the following day Maepherson presents his trophy to the Duke of Wellington himself but his bravery is not rewarded with a promotion.

Badajoz by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
Depicting Cameron Highlanders. during the Battle of Atbara in the Sudan Campaign

Battle of Atbara 1898 by Stanley Berkeley.
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Charge of the 6th Inniskilling Dragoons at Waterloo by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00

 On the 1st of August 1798, thirteen French ships of the line sat anchored in Aboukir Bay off the coast of Alexandria, Egypt, in support of Napoleon who was inland with his troops attempting to conquer the country. As nighttime approached so did Lord Horatio Nelson and the British fleet. Nelson had been hunting Napoleon at sea for months; at Aboukir Bay he had found the French fleet, trapped and unprepared for battle. Nelsons audacious plan was to attack the French on their unprotected prot side, the plan had its risks; the whole of the British fleet could run aground in the shallows - but Nelson knew the waters too well. The Battle of the Nile was one of the most decisive in the history of naval warfare. By the end of the battle nearly all the French ships were sunk or captured. The 124-gun flagship - and the pride of the French navy - LOrient, had exploded with such ferocity that it halted the battle for over ten minutes. Napoleons ability to dominate the region had been crushed, whilst Nelson was to become a hero throughout the whole of Britain.

Battle of the Nile by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
Half Price! - £305.00
Epsom Trophy, Polo Championship

Epsom Trophy by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £20.00
B78.  What Was That by Michael Kitchen Hurle.

What Was That by Michael Kitchen Hurle
Half Price! - £35.00
 The Japanese ship Takao at Flank speed, riding shotgun for the carrier

Flank Speed by Randall Wilson.
Half Price! - £35.00

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Don Breckon Steam Engine Railway Prints.
Country
Country Connection by Don Breckon.
Beside
Beside the Pond by Don Breckon.
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Clipper Ships Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.
Flying

Flying Cloud by Robert Taylor.
Cutty

Cutty Sark by Ivan Berryman.
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Confederate Military Prints.
Portrait
Portrait of General Lee by Geoff Lea.
Furling
Furling the Flag by Richard Brooke.
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Royal Navy Submarine Prints
Secret
Secret Operation by Robert Taylor.
Working

Working Up by Robert Barbour.
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Royal Navy Cruiser Art Prints.
Night

Night Attack on the Newcastle by Robert Taylor.
Richelieu

Richelieu and HMS Cumberland 1945 by Ivan Berryman.
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