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Latest Aviation Art Releases

 An SAS team is picked up by a U.S. Army Special Forces Blackhawk helicopter after a successful operation against the Taliban.

Extraction - Afghanistan 2011 by David Pentland. (PC)
The Luftwaffe had done everything in its power to pummel London into submission but they failed. By the end of September 1940 their losses were mounting. For weeks since the early days of September, London had been the main target for the Luftwaffe and during that time Luftwaffe High Command had grown increasingly despondent as their losses steadily mounted. Far from being on the brink of collapse RAF Fighter Command, though vastly outnumbered, had shown an incredible resilience. The fighting had reached a dramatic climax on Sunday 15th September when, bloodied and bruised, the Luftwaffe had lost the upper hand on a day of intense combat that had culminated with a humiliating retreat. Almost every day that had passed since then had seen the Luftwaffe do everything in its power to pummel London and regain the initiative, but the daylight raids were becoming increasingly costly. On Friday 27th September, 80 days after the Battle of Britain had officially begun, the Luftwaffe came once more, this time concentrating on the fastest bombers they had - Ju88s and Bf110s. And they came in force, principally targeting London and Bristol. Anthony Saunders' superb painting depicts one of these raids, this time by bombers from KG77 as they head over the Medway Estuary, east of the City of London, in an attempt to attack the capital's warehouses and docks. Among the many units defending the capital that day was 92 Squadron from Biggin Hill and Anthony portrays the Spitfire of Pilot Officer Geoffrey Wellum in his dramatic piece. With a deft flick of the rudder Wellum banks his fighter away to port seconds after sharing in the destruction of a Ju88. It was just one of more than 50 German aircraft destroyed by the RAF during the day.
Decisive Blow by Anthony Saunders.
 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.1As of No.610 (County of Chester) Sqn RAAF, intercept incoming Heinkel 111H-16s of the 9th Staffel, Kampfgeschwader 53 Legion Condor during the big daylight raids on London of August and September 1940 - the climax of the Battle of Britain.  Spitfire N3029 (DW-K) was shot down by a Bf109 on the 5th of September 1940 and crash-landed near Gravesend, Kent, thankfully without injury to Sgt Willcocks, the pilot.  For the record, N3029 was rebuilt and, following some brief flying in the UK, was sent overseas by convoy to the Middle East.  Ironically, the ship carrying this aircraft was torpedoed en route and both ship and all its cargo were lost.

Close Encounter by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Two Spitfire Mk1Bs of 92 Squadron patrol the south coast from their temporary base at Ford, here passing over the Needles rocks, Isle of Wight, in the Spring of 1942.

In Them We Trust by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

Latest Naval Art Releases

 In January 1941, the young Mario Arillo was appointed the rank of Lieutenant Commander, placed in charge of the Regia Marina's submarine <i>Ambra</i> and was dispatched to the Mediterranean to help disrupt supplies to the Allied forces.  In May of that same year, Arillo attacked the British Dido Class Cruiser <i>HMS Bonaventure</i>, and Destroyers <i>HMS Hereward</i> and <i>HMS Stuart</i>, south of Crete, en route from Alexandria, the cruiser <i>Bonaventure</i> being sunk with great loss of life.  The <i>Ambra</i> is depicted here in a calmer moment, two of her crew scanning the horizon for 'business'.

Hunter's Dusk by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Under the command of Gianfranco Gazzana-Priaroggia, the Regia Marina submarine Leonardo da Vinci was to become the most successful non-German submarine of World War Two.  On 21st April 1943, she encountered the liberty ship SS John Drayton which was returning, unladen, to Capetown from Bahrain and put two torpedoes into her before surfacing to finish her off with shells.  The deadly reign of terror wrought by the combination of Gazzana-Priaroggia and his submarine came to an end just one month later when the Leonardo da Vinci was sunk by HMS Active and HMS Ness off Cape Finistere.

Scourge of the Deep - Leonardo da Vinci by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Sitting menacingly at a depth of 15 metres below the surface, just 2 km outside the heavily defended harbour of Alexandria, the Italian submarine Scire is shown releasing her three manned torpedoes, or <i>Maiali</i>, at the outset of their daring raid in which the British battleships HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Valiant and a tanker, were severely damaged on 3rd December 1941.  All six crew members of the three <i>Maiali</i> survived the mission, but all were captured and taken prisoner.  Luigi Durand de la Penne and Emilio Bianchi can be seen moving away aboard 221, whilst Vincenzo Martellotta and Mario Marino (222) carry out systems checks.  Antonio Marceglia and Spartaco Schergat, on 223, are heading away at the top of the picture.

Assault from the Deep by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 A Type VIIC U-Boat slips quietly toward the open sea form her pen at Lorient, France in 1942.

Dawn Departure by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

Latest Military Art Releases

  Towards the end of the second battle of Cambrai, British Mark IV tanks of 12th Battalion confronted German captured Mark IVs. The ensuing battle was chaotic, emerging from smoke the Germans were initially mistaken as part of C Company, but at 50 meters both sides recovered from their surprise and opened fire simultaneously. The lead British tank L16 commanded by Captain Rowe was immediately knocked out, who escaped with his men to L19 just in time to see it destroyed, along with L12. The remaining tank L8 had broken down some distance back taking no part in the battle, although its commander Lieutenant Martel managed to use a captured 77mm artillery piece to finally halt the German tank.

Unexpected encounter at Niergnies, France, 8th October 1918 by David Pentland. (PC)
  Fourteen A7V Sturmpanzerwagen and supporting infantry led the final push towards the strategic allied supply hub of Amiens. The panzers were divided into 3 groups, the first Skopnik with 3 tanks attacked and took Villers Bretoneux. The second group Uihlein of seven tanks struck towards the Bois DAquenne, while the third group Steinhardt comprising Elfriede, Nixe, Siegfried and Schnuck drove towards Cachy. The attack may well have succeeded but for the unexpected intervention of Britsh Mk IV and medium Whippet tanks.

The New War Elephants, Cachy, France 24th April 1918 by David Pentland. (PC)
 St. Charmond Assault tanks of the French 10th Heavy Tank battalion move through Villers-Cotterets forest in preparation for the 10th Army counterattack on the German Soissons-Rheims salient.

A Saint goes to War - The Second Marne Offensive, France 18th July 1918 by David Pentland. (PC)
 Schneider CA1 Tanks of the French tenth army spearhead the successful counter offensive against the German army on the river Marne. Overhead a tenacious Junkers JI artillery spotter dogs their tracks. The Second Battle of the Marne, though not an overwhelming victory, spelt the end of German successes on the Western front, and a turning point for the allies.

Tanks on the Marne - France, 18th July 1918 by David Pentland. (PC)

Latest Sport Art Releases



Pride of Lions 1997 by Keith Fearon. (AP)
One of the most enthralling Test series in history unfolded during the summer of 1998 between England and South Africa.  Led by new captain Alec Stewart, England entered the series with renewed optimism.  Following a rain affected 1st Test which England were unlucky not to win and defeat in the 2nd, England looked to heading towards defeat as wickets tumbled on the final day of the 3rd Test at Old Trafford.  As Robert Croft entered the fray, nobody could have envisaged the magnificent rearguard action about to unfold.  After three and a half hours at the crease with the help of sterling support from Darren Gough and Angus Fraser in an unbelievably tense last over, England's tailenders managed to hang on to fight another day.  England buoyed by a welcome return to form by eventual man of the series Mike Atherton, who amassed 493 runs at an average of 54.78 and the drea attack of Fraser, Cork and Gough, levelled the series in the 4th Test at Trent Bridge with Gus Fraser finishing with figures of 10 for 122.  Everything was set up for a dramatic finish at Headingley on a pitch notorious for producing results.  With the match fairly even England's bowlers destroyed the South African openers in their second innings to create a seemingly invincible position until Jonry Rhodes and Brian McMillan staged a dramatic fightback.  It was left to local hero Darren Gough to clinch the game on the final morning leaving the South Africans tantalisingly short and giving England their first major series win in twelve years.

The Vital Wicket by Keith Fearon.

Victory in Valderrama by Keith Fearon. (AP)


Breaking Through by Keith Fearon.
New Print Packs
Richard III and Battle of Bosworth Military Print Pack.
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Battle of Bosworth by Brian Palmer.
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Richard III by Chris Collingwood.
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Nicolas Trudgian Railway Art Prints.
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Spirit of the Mountain by Nicolas Trudgian
Canyon

Canyon of Lost Souls by Nicolas Trudgian
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Battle of Waterloo Napoleon and Wellington Military Prints.
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The Battle of Waterloo by Robert Hillingford (B)
Napoleons

Napoleons Last Grand Attack by Ernest Crofts (B)
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Spitfire Prints by Nicolas Trudgian.
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First Flap of the Day by Nicolas Trudgian. (C)
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Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
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Spitfire Print Pack by Nicolas Trudgian.
Winter
Winter of 41 by Nicolas Trudgian.
Fighter

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
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