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Latest Aviation Art Releases

 Continuing his popular series of Giclée Studio Proofs on canvas, Robert Taylor portrays Squadron Leader 'Sailor' Malan DFC, Commanding Officer of 74 Squadron and one of the great Battle of Britain Aces, in his famous painting Height of the Battle.  Having already made one diving attack into the force of Luftwaffe He111 bombers approaching London with their fighter escort, 'Sailor' peels his Spitfire over for a second attack. Another top Ace, Pilot Officer Harbourne Stephen DFC, is hard on his heels. Below them, typifying the scene as it was on the afternoon of Wednesday 11 September 1940, Mk.I Hurricanes from 17 and 56 Squadrons have already joined the fray.
Height of the Battle by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 The latest Giclée technology has once again brought Robert Taylor's sophisticated artistry to life to faithfully replicate his classic painting of the Hurricanes of 1 Squadron (RCAF).  Becoming operational at Northolt in August 1940 they served with great distinction throughout the Battle of Britain.
Maple Leaf Scramble by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 Few flew the Hurricane better in combat than Squadron Leader John Grandy, Commanding Officer of 249 Squadron. Robert Taylor's iconic painting Hurricane Attack portrays him about to pounce on a Bf110 over the Isle of Wight in August 1940.
Hurricane Attack by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 By any military standards, it is difficult to imagine the Supreme Commander of the largest air force of the day, piloting himself over the battlefront during the early moments of one of historys greatest military operations. But General Jimmy Doollittle was no ordinary commander. Already awarded Americas highest decoration for valour, General Doolittle was, by the summer of 1944, in command of the American 8th Air Force. On the morning of 6 June, D-Day, he dispatched 1350 bombers together with his entire fighter force to attack enemy ground installations near the beachheads. Sitting around waiting for intelligence reports was not Jimmy Doolittles style. He was going to see for himself what was happening! With Pat Partridge as wingman, they took off flying P-38 Lightnings - chosen for their distinctive profile in the hopes they would deter friendly fire - and climbed above the overcast. Having observed the 8th Air Forces operations at first hand, as they turned for home, Doolittle spotted a hole in the clouds, flick-rolled through it and disappeared beneath the cloud layer. Pat Partridge had his head in the cockpit, probably changing his gas tanks, and when he looked up there was no sign of his Supreme Commander, he circled around for a while, then headed for home. Beneath the clouds Doolittle saw - the most impressive and unforgettable sight I could have possibly imagined - . As some 5000 ships of all shapes and sizes landed 176,000 troops on the enemy held beaches of Northern France, Doolittle flew up and down the battlefront assessing how the invasion was progressing, and after a two and a half hour sortie, headed back to base. After landing, Doolittle hurried over to General Eisenhowers headquarters to provide the first report Eisenhower received, beating his own intelligence information by several hours.
Doolittles D-Day, 6th June 1944 by Robert Taylor. (GS)

Latest Naval Art Releases

 Arguably the best known warship in the world, and one of only a few survivors of her era, HMS Victory was the flagship of Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson at Trafalgar in 1805, leading the victorious British fleet into battle against the combined French and Spanish navies.  Severely damaged during the battle, she remained afloat at Portsmouth into the 20th century and is now preserved there in dry dock for future generations to visit.  Extraordinarily, HMS Victory is still a commissioned ship in the Royal Navy and is frequently used for ceremonial duties.

HMS Victory by Ivan Berryman.
 Often described as the most beautiful of all the clippers, the Aberdeen White Star Line's Thermopylae was Cutty Sark's only true rival, the pair often racing each other home to Great Britain from the Far East.  She was unusual in that her design opted for slightly shorter masts, while the span of her yards was increased to compensate, her vast mainsail having a drop of 40ft, carried on a yard that was 80ft wide.  Launched in 1868 at Aberdeen, her fate was a scandal, this wonderful ship being sold to the Portuguese government who employed her briefly as a training ship before she was callously torpedoed and sunk for target practice by the Portuguese navy in December 1907.

Thermopylae by Ivan Berryman.
 Launched on 21st March 2003 as the new flagship of the Cunard fleet, the Queen Mary 2 represents the very pinnacle of ocean liner design, not just in her incredible size and speed, but in the quality of her build and the sumptuousness of her interior.  At 345m long, she is the largest liner ever built and, since her inaugural cruise in January 2004, she has covered over 1.5 million nautical miles and carried 1.3 million passengers.

Queen Mary 2 - Queen of Them All by Ivan Berryman.
 Typical of the many hundreds of craft that took part in the 6th June 1944 landings at Normandy at the opening of Operation Overlord, these unarmed Royal Navy Landing Craft (LCAs) bravely transported many thousands of British and Canadian infantry to the beaches under the most intense fire.

Into the Storm by Ivan Berryman.

Latest Military Art Releases

 Private and Officer - Royal Army Medical Corps, Surgeon-General - Army Medical Staff, Sergeant-Major - Royal Army Medical Corps.

Army Medical Corps by Richard Simkin
 Bridging, Review and Marching Order - Officers, Review Order - Field-Officer and Sapper, Constructing Shelter Trench.

Volunteer Royal Engineers by Richard Simkin
 Undress - Officer, Review Order - Field Officer and Officer, Review Order - 16 Pounder Rifled Muzzle-Loading Field Gun and Detachment.

Volunteer Royal Artillery by Richard Simkin
 Lieutenant - Royal Field Artillery, Captain - Royal Engineers, Lieutenant and Captain (Field Service Hat) - Infantry of the Line, Major (Foreign Service Hat) - Cavalry, Captain - Army Service Corps, Staff.

The New Service Dress for British Officers by Richard Simkin

Latest Sport Art Releases



The Last Three by Alwyn Crawshaw.
 Italian born Simoncelli was a highly promising rider who tragically lost his life at the 2011 Malaysian Grand Prix.  This image is Ray's tribute to this hugely talented young rider.  It depicts Marco Simoncelli racing for the Metis Gilera team in the 2008 250cc World Championship.  The 2008 season saw Simoncelli secure what was to be his only World Championship where a total of 6 race wins and 12 podium finishes saw him finish 37 points ahead of his nearest rival in the Championship standings.

Marco Simoncelli by Ray Goldsbrough.
 David Jefferies, 1000 TAS Suzuki, powers out of Waterworks on his way to a new outright TT lap record - lap 2 Senior TT 2002.

Rhapsody in Blue by Rod Organ.
 Valentino Rossi leads team mate Colin Edwards on the 50th Anniversary Yamahas at the US Moto GP at Laguna Seca, California in 2006.

Yellow Fever by Rod Organ.

This Week's Half Price Art Offers



Summers Reward by Bill Makinson.
Half Price! - £35.00
DHM352B.  Battle of Leipzig, 16th-18th October 1813 by David Rowlands.

Battle of Leipzig, 16th-18th October 1813 by David Rowlands (B)
Half Price! - £20.00
 Oberfeldwebel Albert Kerscher, commander of 2nd company 511 Heavy Tank Battalion aided by a Panzer IV, two Hetzers, a Kingtiger and a Pak gun, successfully defended against concerted Soviet air and armoured attacks, his action buying valuable time for the evacuation of German wounded from Pilau and scoring his 100th victory in the process.

Kerschers Defence of Neuhauser Forest by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £90.00
Bismarck, now complete and newly painted in full Baltic camouflage, returns to Hamburg for the last time as the harsh winter of 1940/41 relents and the pride of the German Kriegsmarine prepares for real action.  In the distance, the pre-Dreadnought Schleswig-Holstein awaits her next commission, the old ship alternating between vital ice-breaker and air defence duties at this time.  The Bismarck would in May 1941 put to sea and engage and sink HMS Hood only to be caught by the British battleships Rodney and King George V.  Bismarck was pounded into a floating wreck, finally being sunk by the torpedoes of HMS Dorsetshire.  From her crew of 2300 only 110 would be rescued by HMS Dorsetshire and HMS Maori.

Bismarck Entering Hamburg Harbour by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00

FAR0988. Siberian Snow by Jonathon Truss.

Siberian Snow by Jonathon Truss.
Half Price! - £25.00
The leading ace of the mighty Eighth Air Force, Gabby Gabreski. He finished the war with a total of 28 air victories and 2 1/2 enemy aircraft destroyed on the ground by strafing airfields. Gabreski also scored 6 1/2 air victories in the Korean war.

Return From Bremen by Simon Smith.
Half Price! - £70.00
 Gazelle of Army Air Corps 661 Squadron on a reconnaissance mission for British 7th Armoured Division during Operation Desert Storm.

Desert Gazelle by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £35.00
 Developed from the Supermarine Seagull, the Walrus was to prove itself a useful and capable workhorse in almost every theatre of the Second World War. Here, HMS Rodney despatches her Shagbat from the catapult atop C turret.

Ships Company by Ivan Berryman (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00

 Mitsubishi G4Ms of 27 Kanoya Kokutai begin their devastating attack on Force Z off the north east coast of Malaya on 10th December 1941. Both Repulse and prince of Wales were lost in the attack, while their accompanying destroyers remained to pick up survivors among them HMS Express which can be seen off HMS Repulse starboard quarter.

HMS Repulse with HMS Prince of Wales Under Attack by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £55.00
 HMS Prince of Wales enters Valetta harbour, Malta.

Enter the Prince by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
Half Price! - £55.00


A Tribute to the Few by Roy Garner. (Y)
Half Price! - £33.00
 A moment during the fraught encounter on 27th May 1940 over Dunkirk between Spitfires of 610 Sqn and an estimated 40 Bf.110s during which three Zerstorers were shot down.

A Dunkirk Encounter by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £270.00

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Don Breckon Steam Engine Railway Prints.
Country
Country Connection by Don Breckon.
Beside
Beside the Pond by Don Breckon.
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Clipper Ships Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.
Flying

Flying Cloud by Robert Taylor.
Cutty

Cutty Sark by Ivan Berryman.
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Confederate Military Prints.
Portrait
Portrait of General Lee by Geoff Lea.
Furling
Furling the Flag by Richard Brooke.
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Royal Navy Submarine Prints
Secret
Secret Operation by Robert Taylor.
Working

Working Up by Robert Barbour.
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Royal Navy Cruiser Art Prints.
Night

Night Attack on the Newcastle by Robert Taylor.
Richelieu

Richelieu and HMS Cumberland 1945 by Ivan Berryman.
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