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Latest Aviation Art Releases

 IAF Squadron Commander Avaham Lanir, flying an Israeli Air Force Mirage III high over the Syrian desert, scores a victory over a Syrian MiG-21 on 9 November 1972. Later, during the Yom Kippur War, his Mirage was hit by a Syrian missile ambush, forcing him to eject over enemy territory. Despite valiant efforts to rescue him, he was captured by the Syrians and died under interrogation.
Desert Victory by Robert Taylor.
 June 1940 and the freedom of Britain lay in the hands of a small band of young RAF fighter pilots. Facing them across the Channel, the all-conquering Luftwaffe stood in eager anticipation of an easy victory, one that would allow were Hitler's mighty armies to invade. So heavily were the odds stacked against the RAF, few gave Fighter Command a chance. The American ambassador to Britain reported that <i>democracy is finished in England</i>. He was wrong.  Although outnumbered more than five to one at the outset, as the savage aerial battles raged continuously over southern England, the courage and dedication of Fighter Command's young airmen gradually turned the tide. By the end of September the battle was won and, for the first time, the Luftwaffe had tasted defeat.  Richard Taylor's outstanding composition portrays a more reflective image of those heroic RAF fighter pilots in contrast perhaps to the deadly trials they faced on a daily basis. Just occasionally during that long hot summer of 1940 were rare moments of peaceful respite. Every minute off-duty was time to be savoured, especially for this particular young fighter pilot and his girl as they briefly pause along a quiet country lane to watch the Spitfires from 92 Squadron pass low overhead. For a few moments the distinctive roar of Merlin engines shatters the peace and they both know that this time tomorrow it will be him who will be flying into combat.
Quiet Reflection by Richard Taylor.
 March 1944 and heavy snow has settled firmly over the frozen Lincolnshire countryside around RAF Fiskerton. For once the Lancasters of 49 Squadron stand quietly idle at their dispersal points around the perimeter of the airfield. It is a scene recreated at many other heavy bomber airfields across the east of England and the young airmen who crew these mighty machines now wait patiently for the inevitable thaw that will soon see them in combat again.  For some, however, the future is uncertain. Just a few weeks later, on 30 March 1944, during a raid on Nuremberg, more than 100 bombers would be shot down. In the space of a single night Bomber Command would suffer more men lost than Fighter Command during the entire Battle of Britain.  Bomber Command flew more than 389,000 sorties from 101 operational bases across the east of England during WWII and the aircrew that undertook these missions came from Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Rhodesia and many countries under Nazi occupation. Every airman was a volunteer and with an average age of just 22 they were forced to grow up quickly, enduring frightening odds and suffering terrible losses - only the Nazi U-Boat force experienced a higher casualty rate.  Of the 125,000 men who served, 55,573 were killed. For every 100 airmen who joined Bomber Command, 45 would lose their lives, 6 would be seriously wounded and 8 made prisoners of war. Yet they resolutely overcame the overwhelming forces stacked against them, including some of the worst flying conditions imaginable and, never flinching from their task, flew until victory was finally achieved.
Ops On Hold by Richard Taylor.
 Yom Kippur - the Day of Atonement - is the holiest day in the Hebrew calendar and in Israel is marked by a national holiday but on that day in 1973 the unexpected happened. At 14.00 hours on 6 October the coalition of Arab states led by Egypt and Syria launched a surprise attack on Israeli positions. Thousands of Egyptian troops swarmed across the Suez Canal into Israeli held Sinai whilst in the north nearly 1,500 Syrian tanks backed by artillery thrust west towards Israel. Facing this sudden surprise attack on the Golan Heights were less than 200 Israeli tanks. In the air, too, Egyptian and Syrian air forces struck in a single, co-ordinated assault hitting the Israeli anti-aircraft defences and hoping to deliver a fatal blow.  Largely unprepared, Israel reeled however within hours it mobilised its fighting reserves and began a ferocious battle to stem the enemies advance. As Israeli tanks and infantry rushed to hold the front line and, in the north, push the enemy back, Israeli Air Force jets overhead fought a heroic battle to regain the initiative and control of the skies. It was grim work. Both Egyptian and Syrian forces were equipped with hundreds of Soviet-supplied SAM missiles but the tide of war was turning and a battered Israeli Air Force now went on the counter-offensive. And amongst their main targets were the heavily-defended Egyptian air bases that lay deep in the Nile delta.  Robert Taylor's powerful and dramatic painting depicts one such strike that took place on 14 October 1973, half way through the war, when Israeli F-4 Phantom fighter-bombers made simultaneous strikes against the Egyptian air bases at Mansoura and Tanta north of Cairo.  After the first wave struck the elite Egyptian MiG-21 units at El Mansoura, the other Phantom squadrons attacked Tanta in waves, turning to dog-fighting immediately after dropping their ordnance. Tanta was also home to two squadrons of Libyan Mirage 5s and the furious air battle that ensued involved countless fighter aircraft. Despite bitter opposition, the successful IAF missions eliminated much of the effectiveness of the Egyptian Air Force and its Libyan allies.
Double Strike by Robert Taylor.

Latest Naval Art Releases

 Built at Toulon in 1803, Bucentaure was the flagship of Admiral Villeneuve at the Battle of Trafalgar on 21st October 1805 and the first to be almost completely disabled by a massive broadside from HMS Victory as Nelson broke through the enemy line.  Bucentaure was taken as a prize by the British fleet, but was lost in the great storm that followed the battle.

Bucentaure by Ivan Berryman.
 Although entirely fictitious, this scene depicts a typical action by pirates in the early 1700s, most likely in the Caribbean where the many supply routes from Europe converged and offered rich pickings.  Although fraught with danger, the rewards for the buccaneers were rich and plenty, many of them rising to great notoriety for their daring exploits.

The Taking of the Lady Grace by Ivan Berryman.
 One of the most iconic ships of all time and now beautifully restored to her 1805 condition at Portsmouth, Nelson's flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar, HMS Victory, is seen here departing Portsmouth Harbour with the frigate Euryalus.

Farewell, Old Portsmouth by Ivan Berryman.
 Launched in 1797, the USS Constitution was the third of her class to be constructed at Edmund Hartt's shipyard in Boston, Massachusetts, this fine ship spending most of her early years in local waters, protecting merchantmen from French marauders.  She is best remembered, however, for her decisive conquests against British ships during the war of 1812, among them the Guerriere against whom the Constitution gained her nickname 'Old Ironsides'.  She continued to serve until 1881 and is still afloat today, the oldest seagoing warship in the world.

USS Constitution - 'Old Ironsides' by Ivan Berryman.

Latest Military Art Releases

 Private and Officer - Royal Army Medical Corps, Surgeon-General - Army Medical Staff, Sergeant-Major - Royal Army Medical Corps.

Army Medical Corps by Richard Simkin
 Bridging, Review and Marching Order - Officers, Review Order - Field-Officer and Sapper, Constructing Shelter Trench.

Volunteer Royal Engineers by Richard Simkin
 Undress - Officer, Review Order - Field Officer and Officer, Review Order - 16 Pounder Rifled Muzzle-Loading Field Gun and Detachment.

Volunteer Royal Artillery by Richard Simkin
 Lieutenant - Royal Field Artillery, Captain - Royal Engineers, Lieutenant and Captain (Field Service Hat) - Infantry of the Line, Major (Foreign Service Hat) - Cavalry, Captain - Army Service Corps, Staff.

The New Service Dress for British Officers by Richard Simkin

Latest Sport Art Releases



The Last Three by Alwyn Crawshaw.
 Italian born Simoncelli was a highly promising rider who tragically lost his life at the 2011 Malaysian Grand Prix.  This image is Ray's tribute to this hugely talented young rider.  It depicts Marco Simoncelli racing for the Metis Gilera team in the 2008 250cc World Championship.  The 2008 season saw Simoncelli secure what was to be his only World Championship where a total of 6 race wins and 12 podium finishes saw him finish 37 points ahead of his nearest rival in the Championship standings.

Marco Simoncelli by Ray Goldsbrough.
 David Jefferies, 1000 TAS Suzuki, powers out of Waterworks on his way to a new outright TT lap record - lap 2 Senior TT 2002.

Rhapsody in Blue by Rod Organ.
 Valentino Rossi leads team mate Colin Edwards on the 50th Anniversary Yamahas at the US Moto GP at Laguna Seca, California in 2006.

Yellow Fever by Rod Organ.
New Print Packs
World War One Aviation Dogfight Art Prints.
Knights

Knights of the Sky by Nicolas Trudgian
Captain

Captain Roy Brown engages the Red Baron, 21st April 1918 by Ivan Berryman.
Save 260!
Duke of Wellington Military Prints.
Portrait

Portrait of Wellington by Chris Collingwood.
Wellington
Wellington at the Battle of Waterloo by Robert Hillingford.
Save 74!
Classic Spitfire Aviation Prints by Nicolas Trudgian.
Combat

Combat Over Beachy Head by Nicolas Trudgian.
Fighter

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
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Spitfire Aviation Print Pack by Nicolas Trudgian.
Squadron

Squadron Scramble by Nicolas Trudgian.
Fighter

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save 200!
Clipper Sailing Ships Art Print Pack.
Flying

Flying Cloud by Robert Taylor.
McKay

McKay Clipper Anglo-American by Roy Cross.
Save 21!