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Latest Aviation Art Releases

 The engineers at Rolls-Royce had worked their magic.  They had somehow managed to squeeze every available ounce of power out of the current Merlin engine and by D-Day on 6 June 1944 the sleek Mk.IX Spitfires of Fighter Command reigned supreme in the skies over Normandy.  The magnificent Mk.IXs were, by far, the most numerous variant of Spitfires that fought from D-Day to the threshold of the Reich.  In the great drive from Normandy across northern France, Belgium and into Holland the Spitfire pilots of Fighter Command threw down the gauntlet to any Luftwaffe pilots brave enough, or foolhardy enough, to tangle with them.  Perhaps the greatest pilot to ever fly the Spitfire was the RAF&39;s top fighter Ace Johnnie Johnson.  His resolute determination and steadfast leadership came into its own during D-Day and the subsequent advance through Normandy, and he would finish the war as the highest scoring Allied Ace in Europe.  The scene captures the moment when, as Wing Leader of 127 Canadian Wing, Johnnie is seen leading Mk.IX Spitfires from 421 <i>Red Indian</i> Squadron RCAF out on patrol from their airfield at Evère near Brussels on a cold December morning in 1944.  It is close to the fighting and the German front line so, as the Canadians climb steadily out over the snow clad landscape in the golden light of dawn, they are already alert and on the lookout for the first signs of trouble.

Midwinter Dawn by Robert Taylor.
 The swaggering figure of the Reichsmarshal swept imperiously into the Air Ministry on Berlin's Wilhemstrasse, his jewel-encrusted baton and extravagant uniform as flamboyant as ever. This was Saturday, 30th January 1943, the tenth Anniversary of the Nazi Party coming to power, and Goering was about to deliver the main speech in tribute to the Party and its leader, the Fuhrer - Adolf Hitler.  The Royal Air Force had other plans for the anniversary.  In stark defiance of the imagined air security safeguarding Berlin, brave pilots of 105 and 139 Sqn's took to the air in de Havilland Mosquitoes, on course for Germany.  Their mission: RAF Bomber Command's first daylight raid on Berlin!  The raid was timed to perfection and three Mosquitoes of 105 Sqn raced headlong, low level towards their target - the Haus des Rundfunks, headquarters of the German State broadcasting company.  It was an hour before Goering could finally be broadcast.  He was boiling with rage and humiliation.  A few hours later, adding further insult, Mosquitoes from 139 Sqn swept over the city in a second attack moments before Goebbels addressed a Nazi mass rally in the Sportpalast.  Goering's promise that enemy aircraft would never fly over the Reich was broken, the echo of that shame would haunt him for the rest of the war.  This  dramatic painting pays tribute to this pivotal moment in the war, capturing the Mosquito B.Mk.IVs of 105 Sqn departing the target area, following their successful strike on the Haus des Rundfunk.

Strike on Berlin by Anthony Saunders.
 Without air supremacy D-Day and the invasion of north-west Europe would never have happened, and the tactical Ninth Air Force played a huge part in securing that position.  The Ninth had fought with distinction from the deserts of North Africa to the invasion of Sicily and the fighting in Italy.  They had spearheaded the assault on Ploesti and, from humble beginnings, had grown into one of the finest and most formidable Air Forces in the USAAF.  Then, in October 1943, the Ninth were sent to England for their greatest challenge so far - providing air support for the US First Army during the forthcoming invasion of Normandy.  By the morning of 6th June 1944 the Ninth was the largest and most effective tactical air force in the world, with over a quarter of a million personnel and more than 3,500 fighters, bombers and troop-carriers under its command.  Amongst them were the P-47s of the 365th Fighter Group - the fearsome <i>Hell Hawks</i> - a unit that by the end of World War Two would become legendary.  Amongst the first to use P-47s as fighter-bombers, the <i>Hell Hawks</i> were hard at work softening up the enemy in the build up to D-Day, dive-bombing bridges, rail lines, gun positions and airfields.  With two 1,000-pound bombs below their wings along with ten 5-in rockets and eight .50 calibre machine guns, their enormous firepower devastated the German defenses on D-Day.  The <i>Hell Hawks</i> supported the army throughout the Normandy campaign, all the way across northern France to the Battle of the Bulge in December 1944, and beyond.  It was a harsh nomadic life, eating and sleeping in tents and moving from one temporary strip to the next.  By the end of hostilities in May 1945 the <i>Hell Hawks</i> had moved through 11 different airfields, more than any other fighter-bomber group in the Ninth Air Force.
Hell Hawks Over Utah by Robert Taylor.
 B-17G 2107027 is depicted limping home to Bassingbourn with the starboard outer propeller feathered following a raid during the Summer of 1944.  'Hikin' for Home' served with the 322nd Bomb Sqn, 91st Bomb Group as part of the 8th Air Force.  Escorting her home is Major George Preddy, the highest scoring P-51 pilot and sixth in the list of all-time top American Aces, seen here flying 413321 'Cripes a Mighty 3rd'.

Hikin' for Home by Ivan Berryman.

Latest Naval Art Releases

 Arguably the best known warship in the world, and one of only a few survivors of her era, HMS Victory was the flagship of Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson at Trafalgar in 1805, leading the victorious British fleet into battle against the combined French and Spanish navies.  Severely damaged during the battle, she remained afloat at Portsmouth into the 20th century and is now preserved there in dry dock for future generations to visit.  Extraordinarily, HMS Victory is still a commissioned ship in the Royal Navy and is frequently used for ceremonial duties.

HMS Victory by Ivan Berryman.
 Often described as the most beautiful of all the clippers, the Aberdeen White Star Line's Thermopylae was Cutty Sark's only true rival, the pair often racing each other home to Great Britain from the Far East.  She was unusual in that her design opted for slightly shorter masts, while the span of her yards was increased to compensate, her vast mainsail having a drop of 40ft, carried on a yard that was 80ft wide.  Launched in 1868 at Aberdeen, her fate was a scandal, this wonderful ship being sold to the Portuguese government who employed her briefly as a training ship before she was callously torpedoed and sunk for target practice by the Portuguese navy in December 1907.

Thermopylae by Ivan Berryman.
 Launched on 21st March 2003 as the new flagship of the Cunard fleet, the Queen Mary 2 represents the very pinnacle of ocean liner design, not just in her incredible size and speed, but in the quality of her build and the sumptuousness of her interior.  At 345m long, she is the largest liner ever built and, since her inaugural cruise in January 2004, she has covered over 1.5 million nautical miles and carried 1.3 million passengers.

Queen Mary 2 - Queen of Them All by Ivan Berryman.
 Typical of the many hundreds of craft that took part in the 6th June 1944 landings at Normandy at the opening of Operation Overlord, these unarmed Royal Navy Landing Craft (LCAs) bravely transported many thousands of British and Canadian infantry to the beaches under the most intense fire.

Into the Storm by Ivan Berryman.

Latest Military Art Releases

 <i>IN HONOUR AND IN RECOGNITION OF ROBERT E.WRIGHT, KENNETH J. MOORE, MEDICS 2nd Bn 501 PIR, 101st AIRBORNE DIVISION<br><br>FOR HUMANE AND LIFE-SAVING CARE RENDERED TO 80 COMBATANTS AND A CHILD IN THIS CHURCH IN JUNE 1944.</i><br><br>These simple words, carved into a stone memorial outside the ancient church at Angouville-au-Plain, a small hamlet six miles south-west of Utah Beach in Normandy, recall the heroic actions that took place. In the early hours of 6 June 1944 two medics from the 101st Airborne – Kenneth Moore and Robert Wright – arrived to find themselves in the middle of a confused and savage firefight. Undeterred by the fighting around them the two men immediately set up a field dressing-station in the little village church to treat the growing numbers of wounded. In an act of true humanity within the brutality of war, the two medics insisted on treating every wounded soldier brought here equally, regardless of the uniform they wore. There was, however, one simple rule. No guns were to be brought inside the church. When two German paratroopers burst through the doors, machine-guns raised, the medics simply stared them straight in the eye and nodded down to the young German soldier they were treating. The two enemy paratroopers immediately understood. Both saluted and withdrew. By the time the fighting was over, all but three of the 80 wounded had survived.

We Treated Them All The Same by Simon Smith.
 After single-handedly destroying a German Mark V Panther tank that had pinned down his unit, First Lieutenant James Maggie Megellas leads his platoon from the 3rd Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne towards the Belgian town of Herresbach, 28 January 1945, as the Battle of the Bulge draws to its conclusion. Minutes before, despite being vastly outnumbered in heavy snow and freezing conditions, the platoon had overwhelmed and completely defeated a large force of German infantry in a ferocious frontal assault, without losing a single man. Simon Smith's dramatic image picks up the story as, with the Panther rendered harmless, Megellas readies his men for their final advance into Herresbach.

Act of Valor by Simon Smith.
 Normandy, France, 1944. Lloyd carriers and 6 pounder anti-tank guns of the British 43rd (Wessex) Division prepare to deploy in a French field against possible German counter attacks.

A Suitable Site by David Pentland.
 Normandy, France, 1944. British Churchill Mk VII tanks of 147 Regiment, 34th Tank Brigade, Royal Armoured Corps, move through a deserted Normandy farmyard in the dense Normandy Bocage.

Mr Churchill's Tank by David Pentland.

Latest Sport Art Releases



The Last Three by Alwyn Crawshaw.
 Italian born Simoncelli was a highly promising rider who tragically lost his life at the 2011 Malaysian Grand Prix.  This image is Ray's tribute to this hugely talented young rider.  It depicts Marco Simoncelli racing for the Metis Gilera team in the 2008 250cc World Championship.  The 2008 season saw Simoncelli secure what was to be his only World Championship where a total of 6 race wins and 12 podium finishes saw him finish 37 points ahead of his nearest rival in the Championship standings.

Marco Simoncelli by Ray Goldsbrough.
 David Jefferies, 1000 TAS Suzuki, powers out of Waterworks on his way to a new outright TT lap record - lap 2 Senior TT 2002.

Rhapsody in Blue by Rod Organ.
 Valentino Rossi leads team mate Colin Edwards on the 50th Anniversary Yamahas at the US Moto GP at Laguna Seca, California in 2006.

Yellow Fever by Rod Organ.

This Week's Half Price Art Offers

 One of the most notable pilots of 3 Squadron was the Frenchman Pierre Clostermann who enjoyed much success flying Spitfires with the Free French 341 <i>Alsace</i> Squadron before moving to 602 and 274 Squadrons RAF.  Once on the strength of 3 Squadron, however, he quickly got to grips with the mighty Hawker Tempest V in which he downed two Focke-Wulf Fw.190D-9s on 20th April 1945, just two of the confirmed 12 aircraft destroyed whilst flying the Tempest, plus 6 shared and two probables.  He is shown here flying Tempest V NV724, bearing the legend <i>Le Grand Charles</i> and the Squadron badge on the tailfin.

Tribute to Flt Lt Pierre Clostermann by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £90.00
SWSR341.  The Workers by Donna Crawshaw.
The Workers by Donna Crawshaw
Half Price! - £10.00
On Sunday October 25th 1992, HMS Vanguard, the Royal Navys first Trident equipped submarine, arrived off the Clyde Submarine Base, Faslane on the Gareloch. She was escorted by a Sea King helicopter from HMS Gannet, the RN shore base at Prestwick Airport, and a mixed surface flotilla, including Defence Police and Royal Marines.

Trident by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £45.00
 At 0620 hours covered by a brief barrage from 1000 guns, Brigadier General Elles in a MkIV called Hilda led his 476 tanks against the impregnable German Hindenburg line at Cambrai.  Supported by 6 infantry divisions and 4 Royal Flying Corps squadrons flying ground attack missions, the attack had broken through 3 trench lines and penetrated 5 miles on a 6 mile front by lunchtime.  Although these gains were not exploited and later retaken by a German counter offensive, Cambrai showed the full potential of the tank on the battlefield.

To the Green Fields Beyond, Cambrai, France, 20th November 1917 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

 Sunset over Aboukir Bay on 1st August 1798 as ships of the Royal Navy, led by Nelson, conduct their ruthless destruction of the anchored French fleet. Ships shown from left to right. HMS Orion, Spartiate, Aquilon, Peuple Souvrain, HMS Defence, HMS Minotaur and HMS Swiftsure.

Battle of the Nile by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £325.00
 Almost every major invasion that took place in Europe in World War II began with para drops, and in almost every case the C-47 was the aircraft that delivered these elite fighting troops. Few C-47 pilots had more combat experience than Sid Harwell, seen flying his Dakota in this typical action scene, dropping airborne troops into occupied Europe soon after D-Day. No matter what resistance he encountered, the good C-47 pilot put his aircraft right over the Dropping Zone, every time.
Invasion Force by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00
 RAF Hastings drop men of 3 PARA battalion on the Egyptian airfield of El Gamil as part of the Airborne element of Operation Musketeer, (Anglo-French plan to re-open the Suez Canal after its closure by Egyptian President Nasser) Carried to their target by 18 Valettas and 9 Hastings of RAF Transport Command, and supported by Air strikes by Fleet Air Arm Sea Venoms and Seahawks they quickly succeeded in securing their objective.

Suez Drop, 5th November 1956 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1900.00
Originally constructed as a Home Fleet Repair Ship, HMS Cyclops was later converted into a submarine depot ship and enjoyed a long career, both in the Mediterranean and in home waters.  Here she prepares to receive HMS Sceptre.  Another S-class submarine is already tethered alongside.

HMS Cyclops Prepares to Receive HMS Sceptre by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £500.00

 At 0154am, Pilot officer Les Knight in Avro Lancaster AJ-N transmitted the codeword Dinghy, the signal that the Eder Dam had been successfully breached. Although the target was undefended by flak, its location made it extremely difficult to hit. In fact, four of the five aircraft involved in the attack failed in their attempts and Knights was the last available aircraft carrying the last available bomb!
Target Y The Eder Dam Raid, The Ruhr Valley, 17th May 1942 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £100.00
CC216. Liverpool by Chris Collingwood.

Liverpool by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £1800.00
 A sad, but magnificent sight on 24th October 2003 as the last three British Airways Concordes bring commercial supersonic travel to a close, as they taxi together to their final dispersal at Heathrow.

Concorde Farewell by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
GL0023. Henley by Graeme Lothian.

Henley by Graeme Lothian.
Half Price! - £50.00

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Balaclava Military Art Print Pack.
Officer

Officer 17th Lancers, Balaclava 1854 by Mark Churms.
Charge

Charge of the 17th Lancers at the Battle of the Balaclava by Brian Palmer.
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Pegasus Bridge Military Art Print Pack.
Piper

Piper Bill, Pegasus Bridge, Normandy, 13.00hrs, 6th June 1944 by David Pentland.
Storming

Storming Pegasus Bridge by David Pentland.
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Royal Navy Cruisers Naval Prints.
HMS

HMS Belfast by Robert Taylor.
HMS

HMS Belfast During the Battle of North Cape by Randall Wilson.
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Dambusters 70th Anniversary Double Remarques by Anthony Saunders.
Final

Final Briefing by Anthony Saunders. (RMB)
The

The Breach by Anthony Saunders. (RMB)
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Battle of Trafalgar Maritime Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.
The
The Battle of Trafalgar by Robert Taylor.
The

The Battle of Trafalgar - The First Engagement by Ivan Berryman.
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